Page 129 of 141 FirstFirst ... 2979119125126127128129130131132133139 ... LastLast
Results 1,921 to 1,935 of 2109
  1. #1921
    Senior Member Moriarty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,170

    Default

    The Son of Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs

  2. #1922
    Psychological violence Moose100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Troll Graveyard
    Posts
    9,649

    Default

    No clue this forum was here.
    The Expanse trilogy.
    Leviathan Wakes
    Calibans War
    Abbodons Gate

  3. #1923
    RIP Ronnie James Dio Deathstroke's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    16,287

    Default

    Finished the Lorna Barrett novel Bookplate Special.
    I'm on Twitter

    "I can't complain. I got to be Jim Morrison for the first half of my life, and Ward Cleaver for the second half." - Warren Zevon.

  4. #1924
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    16,484

    Default

    A Curious Man: The Strange and Brilliant Life of Robert "Believe It or Not!" Ripley by Neal Thompson


    As a child certain things stood out. One of those things was the ubiquitousness of paperback books of Ripley's Believe It or Not. They were at home. At the library. In every classroom. And just about the time they seemed to have gone away...there was Jack Palance on the television. I grew up with Ripley...without knowing a thing about him.

    And oddly that didn't change. While no expert, I'm well versed in comic strip history. But Robert Ripley's name seldom seems to come up. For all that he was the highest paid cartoonist of the time, he takes a historical back seat to Caniff, Capp, etc., etc.

    This book finally gives Ripley his due. From his hardluck childhood to multimedia phenomenon we get a well-paced look at one of the great cartoonists and travelers of the early 20th Century. This is the unadulterated Ripley, warts and all. And well worth the read.

  5. #1925
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    7,751

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    A Curious Man: The Strange and Brilliant Life of Robert "Believe It or Not!" Ripley by Neal Thompson


    As a child certain things stood out. One of those things was the ubiquitousness of paperback books of Ripley's Believe It or Not. They were at home. At the library. In every classroom. And just about the time they seemed to have gone away...there was Jack Palance on the television. I grew up with Ripley...without knowing a thing about him.

    And oddly that didn't change. While no expert, I'm well versed in comic strip history. But Robert Ripley's name seldom seems to come up. For all that he was the highest paid cartoonist of the time, he takes a historical back seat to Caniff, Capp, etc., etc.

    This book finally gives Ripley his due. From his hardluck childhood to multimedia phenomenon we get a well-paced look at one of the great cartoonists and travelers of the early 20th Century. This is the unadulterated Ripley, warts and all. And well worth the read.
    Ripley's Believe It or Not still occupied a prominent space in the local newspaper when I was growing up in the late 60s-early70s. Can't recall right now exactly when it disappeared from there - was it before the tv show, or did the two overlap?

  6. #1926
    RIP Ronnie James Dio Deathstroke's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    16,287

    Default

    I finished the C.J. box novel "Blood Trail" today.
    I'm on Twitter

    "I can't complain. I got to be Jim Morrison for the first half of my life, and Ward Cleaver for the second half." - Warren Zevon.

  7. #1927
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    16,484

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    Ripley's Believe It or Not still occupied a prominent space in the local newspaper when I was growing up in the late 60s-early70s. Can't recall right now exactly when it disappeared from there - was it before the tv show, or did the two overlap?
    It's still in syndication. Not sure how many papers it's in. But there are new panels online.

  8. #1928
    Senior Member Moriarty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,170

    Default

    Tarzan and the Golden Lion by Edgar Rice Burroughs

  9. #1929
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    16,484

    Default

    The Fifth Elephant by Terry Pratchett.

    Easily one of he best Discworld novels yet.

  10. #1930
    Senior Member Moriarty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,170

    Default

    Doctor Who: Ten Little Aliens by Stephen Cole

  11. #1931
    Hey don't call. Gary_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    8,157

    Default

    The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt

    A very entertaining book narrated by a hired gun.

  12. #1932
    Administrator Expletive Deleted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    16,501

    Default

    Dare Me by Megan Abbott. If I describe the high concept, it's going to sound incredibly trashy and gimmicky (and there's an extent to which that's true), but it's really a very solid neo-noir with sharp dialogue. Set in a high school. Starring cheerleaders. See?
    Expletive Deleted

  13. #1933
    RIP Ronnie James Dio Deathstroke's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    16,287

    Default

    I finished reading the Castle tie in novel Deadly Heat today.
    I'm on Twitter

    "I can't complain. I got to be Jim Morrison for the first half of my life, and Ward Cleaver for the second half." - Warren Zevon.

  14. #1934
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    16,484

    Default

    Butchers Moon by Richard Stark.

    This is the last of the original Parker novels. It also deviates from the format that had run through all the previous books. It's twice as long as most of the books. And it's not divided in to sections as the others had been. Yeah, it was formula but it was formula that worked.

    Not that this one didn't work. It was an OK read. But I found it to be among the weaker books in the series. A lot of the characterization seemed a touch off.

  15. #1935
    Administrator Expletive Deleted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    16,501

    Default

    The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter. I read this a while ago, but I'm re-reading it before I tackle the sequel, so I thought I'd mention it.

    The premise is that a crackpot inventor in Wisconsin develops a simple device called a Stepper, using easily sourced components (including a potato), that allows a person to travel to alternate Earths. All of these alternate Earths are virgin worlds, seemingly untouched by humanity. Several of the threads tracks the diaspora as various people and groups branch out hundreds of thousands of worlds away from the so-called Datum Earth in search of new frontiers, while others track the effects of population loss and unlimited natural resources on those who remain. The main characters are ostensibly a young man who can naturally Step between worlds and an AI who claims to be a reincarnated Tibetan motorcycle mechanic, but the book spends just as much time away from them as with them.

    It's a lot more Baxter than Pratchett, but you can play "Spot Terry's Contribution" relatively easily. There are some characters and concepts that are clearly his work, and a few chapters that have his stamp. Still, Baxter does solid science fiction. He's maybe a little too technical in places (I don't think I needed quite so much information about the AI's inner workings) and his character work tends towards the bland, but he handles the shifting perspective and rotating cast with aplomb and the extrapolations and implications of Stepping are well thought out. Overall, it's decent. It's not a home run, but for a little bit of above average soft sci-fi or for Pratchett completists, it's worth a look.
    Expletive Deleted

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •