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  1. #1891
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSY View Post
    I read this last year after having read 'Don Quijote' for the first time, and I agree- it's an excellent read, and though I'm not a huge fan of Cortes or the 'civilizing' path that was cut through the Americas by Europeans, I felt that the book was much more level headed and down to earth about the events of those times than I expected.

    Currently I'm re-reading translations of Japanese classics of the Heian era: finished Seidensticker's 'The Tale of Genji' today (for the sixth full time), plan on making my way through Sei Shonagon's 'Pillow Book' and 'Tales of Ise' by week's end.

    I'm very lucky to work a third shift job where my hardest responsibility is staying awake to deal with the occasional drunk or drug crazed maniac.
    Is the Seidensticker Genji the one you prefer? I have a copy of the Royall Tyler translation but haven't gotten round to reading it yet.

  2. #1892
    RIP Ronnie James Dio Deathstroke's Avatar
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    I finished the C.J. Box novel Winterkill yesterday.
    I'm on Twitter

    "I can't complain. I got to be Jim Morrison for the first half of my life, and Ward Cleaver for the second half." - Warren Zevon.

  3. #1893
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    How the States Got Their Shapes by Mark Stein.

  4. #1894
    whatever Jodoc's Avatar
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    The Man from Mars by Fred Nadis

    An intriguing look at Ray Palmer, the sf writer/editor probably best known for his involvement in the infamous Shaver mystery and the early flying saucer movement. Sad, funny, puzzling - makes me want to learn more about the man and his work.
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  5. #1895
    The Green Knight Lord of the Unreal's Avatar
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    I am reading Book 5 of The Dresden Files: Death Masks.
    "The dream does not end until I say so."

  6. #1896
    RIP Ronnie James Dio Deathstroke's Avatar
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    I finished the Lorna Barrett mystery Bookmarked For Death.
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    "I can't complain. I got to be Jim Morrison for the first half of my life, and Ward Cleaver for the second half." - Warren Zevon.

  7. #1897
    Administrator Expletive Deleted's Avatar
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    I read Ben Aaronovitch's Broken Homes, the latest in his "Rivers of London" series of urban fantasy police procedurals. This one revolves around a series of mysterious deaths related to a neo-brutalist housing project in South London. The procedural plot of this one is a little weak, but the charm of this series is the playfulness of the characters and the lived-in setting. I was particularly fond of the chapters revolving around a festival thrown by the local supernatural community; there're minimal connections to the novel's plot, but it's just a lot of fun. On the negative side, I'm a little iffy on the treatment of some of the female characters, but it depends on where Aaronovitch takes the series going forward.
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  8. #1898
    whatever Jodoc's Avatar
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    Tarzan and the Forbidden City by Edgar Rice Burroughs

    Wow. Just about every cliché in the series is thrown into this one. Two lost cities at war? Check. A guy who looks remarkably like Tarzan? Check. A queen who falls in love w/Tarzan? Check. An endless round of people getting separated, captured, rescued, going off to rescue somebody else? Check. About two/thirds of the way through, I gave up trying to keep track of who was where, figuring if I just kept going to the end, it would all work out. And it did, in the most rushed ending I've seen. I thought the end of Tarzan at the Earth's Core was rushed, but here we have a major battle, a major confrontation, a big reveal, some joyous reunions, and Tarzan's judgment of humanity, all crammed into the last few pages. The only thing missing was Tarzan having amnesia, and I'm sure he would've stuck that in too, if he'd thought of it.

    I think I need to take a break from this series for a while.
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  9. #1899
    Junior Member SSY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    Is the Seidensticker Genji the one you prefer? I have a copy of the Royall Tyler translation but haven't gotten round to reading it yet.
    Seidensticker's is definitely the one I prefer- though I found the way he footnoted the text to be either intrusive, repetitive or unneeded a lot of the time. I'm also disappointed that he left out the traditional blank chapter when the main character disappears from the action (which I only found out about recently).

    I've only read selections of the Tyler translation. My first experience with the book was the Waley version- which I liked, but I changed my mind when I read about the liberties he took with the text. Seidensticker seems the most subtle to me.

    I read a lot of literature in translation, and when I can I like to compare different versions of a text ('Les Fleur du Mal' got me into that, with the Lowell version of the intro...). Burton's 'Arabian Nights' is an entirely different animal from the Mathers, or my new favorite, the Hawaddy translation/reconstruction. I still haven't found a translator of Rilke I think wins out over others.

  10. #1900
    Junior Member SSY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moriarty View Post
    A Walk In The Woods by Bill Bryson
    Just read this last year, my mother's a pretty big fan of his. He has an excellent sense of humor. I want to pick up his European travel book.

  11. #1901
    Junior Member hugglebunny's Avatar
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    About to start This Dark Earth by John Hornor Jacobs.

  12. #1902

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    Promise of Blood by Brian MacClellan.

  13. #1903
    whatever Jodoc's Avatar
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    Tarzan's Quest by Edgar Rice Burroughs

    Forgot to write this one up. While the basic plot is more of the same, characters get separated/get captured/escape/run around some more, there's actually a lot to like about this book. Most of the main clichés are missing; there's a lost city, but only one. No amnesia, no double for Tarzan. Best of all, Jane is back after a long absence, in what may be her best appearance in the series. She's in charge of one group while Tarzan's off in the other main thread, and she's smart, capable, tough - just a terrific heroine. (I recently watched the 2nd Weissmuller movie, Tarzan and his Mate, and I was surprised at how much I really enjoyed it. For all that they got Tarzan wrong, they got Jane so right. Say what you will about Burroughs' faults as a writer, he created some kick-ass females.) Plus we get a fun sequence where Nkima gets a love interest. Burroughs had a way of writing about his animals, giving them motivations and feelings without making them too anthropomorphic. Overall, a good read. BUT - this is the book where Tarzan discovers a source of immortality, and brings enough home for family and friends. Wouldn't you think that would be a big deal? It's just kind of presented at the end. Oh hey, we're immortal now. Oh, cool. Something more should have been done with that, y'know?
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  14. #1904
    Junior Member Spireite's Avatar
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    The Call of Cthulhu - HP Lovecraft. Shouldn't take long. I've read it before but never owned a copy of it for some reason, so have recently bought one to put that right. I haven't read an old book for a while though so it's a little strange getting used to properly structured sentences and a startling lack of colloquialisms again (comparatively). Ahh, proper writing, how I have missed thee. Of course, all this will be forgotten when Robert Rankin's Alice On Mars turns up :)
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  15. #1905
    Soul Gem Resident adam_warlock_2099's Avatar
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    Tropic of Capricorn -- Henry Miller
    The Prisoner of Sex -- Norman Mailer
    Nights of Love & Laughter -- Henry Miller

    Presently reading The Raid -- John Brick ... most of these and among others I haven't read yet are books I acquired 3 or so months back at the local library's book sale.

    I've read Bukowski's Women again, maybe third read, here recently. That's most of what I have read since the last time I remember posting here.
    "To alcohol, the cause of and solution to all of life's problems." -- Homer Simpson
    "You get what everyone gets. You get a lifetime." -- Death (Sandman)

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