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  1. #1711
    Senior Member Moriarty's Avatar
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    Star Wars Edge of Victory II: Rebirth by Greg Keyes

  2. #1712
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    Recently finished THE BOOK OF MERLYN. I haven't read the rest of the ONCE AND FUTURE KING series, and admittedly BOM is meant as a sort of closing act to those books.

    Still, White's story in BOM is largely just the author sorting out his aversion to war through the character of Merlyn. It's kind of fusty and not very well thought out.

  3. #1713
    Senior Member Moriarty's Avatar
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    Star Wars: Star by Star by Troy Denning

  4. #1714
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    The Mad Scientist's Guide to World Domination, edited by John Joseph Adams. It's the usual mixed bag of any themed anthology, but there are some gems. I particularly liked Austin Grossman's story of a supervillain's apology to his fiancée for years of secret identity deception.

    Imager's Battalion by L.E. Modesitt Jr. It's Modesitt's usual left-brained approach to fantasy, so some amount of logistical detail is to be expected, but this story of a military campaign in his "Imager" series gets swiftly bogged down in troop movements, tactical decisions, training, and supply chains that seem to go on forever without really amounting to much. I liked the sections on the development of the unit of magic users that gives the book it's title and some of the battle scenes are fun, but the slower sections make the whole thing a bit of a slog.
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  5. #1715
    RIP Ronnie James Dio Deathstroke's Avatar
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    I finished reading the Iris and Roy Johansen thriller "Close Your Eyes" today.
    I'm on Twitter

    "I can't complain. I got to be Jim Morrison for the first half of my life, and Ward Cleaver for the second half." - Warren Zevon.

  6. #1716
    Elder Member Libaax's Avatar
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    Im reading the most important book in western literature and i dont fell its overrated.

    The Illiad

    Heh also i feel there are spoilers about close 3000 years old poem. Homer writes to poetically about Hector but i know what happens in later songs. The oral tradition style makes it very interesting, all legendary names im suppose to know.
    Last edited by Libaax; 02-21-2013 at 07:07 AM.
    Pull List:
    The Walking Dead,Fatale,Near Death,Storm Dogs,Happy,BPRD,XO-Manowar
    American Vampire,Animal Man,Swamp Thing
    Daredevil, Winter Soldier,Indestructible Hulk

  7. #1717
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libaax View Post
    Im reading the most important book in western literature and i dont fell its overrated.

    The Illiad

    Heh also i feel there are spoilers about close 3000 years old poem. Homer writes to poetically about Hector but i know what happens in later songs. The oral tradition style makes it very interesting, all legendary names im suppose to know.
    Agree - one of the greatest books ever written.

    Probably your copy already takes care of this in with own notes, but there are guides to the Iliad you can get either as books or online. I found one based on Robert Lattimore's English translation here , with hyperlinks you can click on to get the notes.


    I've just started what will be my very first Don Delillo book, The Names. Too early to say what I'll think of it yet.

    edit: that should be Richmond Lattimore, not Robert.
    Last edited by berk; 03-02-2013 at 07:33 AM.

  8. #1718
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Very limited Internet access lately.

    Pest Control by Bill Fitzhugh. Comic caper in which an exterminator is mistaken for an international assassin. Humorous read.

    Lucky at Cards by Lawrence Block. Early Block that is noirish. The ending departs from the genre standard. It's a decent early effort.

    And a re-read of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. I read this one with Connor as part of an extra credit assignment for his 6th grade English class. A rightful classic. Atticus Finch is an inspiration as a lawyer and a father.

  9. #1719
    Elder Member Libaax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    Agree - one of the greatest books ever written.

    Probably your copy already takes care of this in with own notes, but there are guides to the Iliad you can get either as books or online. I found one based on Robert Lattimore's English translation here , with hyperlinks you can click on to get the notes.


    I've just started what will be my very first Don Delillo book, The Names. Too early to say what I'll think of it yet.

    My own copy have notes on the names, little info if i want to know who this small god is and who that king is.

    I wonder did you find the brutal war scenes hard to read? There were something in your face realism about all the mentions,descriptions of men dying in war through a spear in their shoulder or in their mouth or in their pelvis. That part was like 60 pages long before it changed to other part of the story.
    Pull List:
    The Walking Dead,Fatale,Near Death,Storm Dogs,Happy,BPRD,XO-Manowar
    American Vampire,Animal Man,Swamp Thing
    Daredevil, Winter Soldier,Indestructible Hulk

  10. #1720
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libaax View Post
    My own copy have notes on the names, little info if i want to know who this small god is and who that king is.

    I wonder did you find the brutal war scenes hard to read? There were something in your face realism about all the mentions,descriptions of men dying in war through a spear in their shoulder or in their mouth or in their pelvis. That part was like 60 pages long before it changed to other part of the story.
    Sometimes, yes: it was pretty brutal, as you say. In some ways you could see the Iliad as the first anti-war story in literature.

  11. #1721
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    I read some sort of young readers' version of The Iliad when I was ... well ... a young reader. Maybe 11. Loved it; never did really warm to The Odyssey, for some reason.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  12. #1722
    Senior Member Moriarty's Avatar
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    Time Enough For Love by Robert Heinlein

  13. #1723
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    Edgewise, by Graham Masterton.

    This thriller is built like a summer horror movie, all action and little introspection. In this case, it's not a bad thing: it gives the story a very brisk pace.

    The book is about a woman who kind of unwittingly strikes a deal with supernatural forces so that her children (abducted by their own father) are returned to her, and how she is unable to make good on her part of the bargain once the kids are back. She then struggles to escape the wrath of the wronged party.

    The first half of the novel is pretty darn good, as it efficiently maintains the suspension of disbelief. The book opens as the lady is the victim of a murder attempt by a fringe group of "divorced father's rights" defenders: those nutters abduct her kids during the night to bring them to their father and try to burn the lady alive in her own house. She manages to escape (although heavily singed!) and is convinced her ex-husband must be behind the attempt, as he took her winning sole custody of the children rather poorly.

    After many weeks, the FBI is still unable to retrace either the husband or the children, and the lady decides to turn to a private eye that her own boss recommended, as his own bother once hired him to good effect. Said private eye happens to know a Sioux shaman who can apparently sic a wendigo on people who have disappeared, and this dreadful, cannibalistic hunting spirit never fails.

    What I appreciated at this point is the several degrees of separation between the lady and the (eventual) supernatural element. It would have stretched credibility mightily had she known a private eye or if she had known a shaman, as most of us don't know either on a personal basis. But here the shaman is known by a private eye who's once been hired by the brother of the lady's boss, which makes it more palatable. Furthermore, we don't get the usual silly plot-dictated moment where people argue about whether the supernatural exists or not; the lady doesn't, but her private eye tells her that she doesn't have to anyway; the shaman says he can get her kids back within three days, and if he doesn't she just doesn't have to pay him (which sounds like a fair deal, ghosts or not).

    Oh, and the price isn't money... the price for the shaman's service is a narrow piece of land that is sacred by the Natives and that the lady's employer is in the business of developing as a lakeside resort. Talking to her boss (a smarmy man who's got the hots for her) about the Native land, she gets him it agree that it would be good publicity for the project to give back some acreage to the Sioux out of respect for the place's history. He later tells her, trying to ingratiate himself, that he spoke to the actual current owner of the land and that all is in order

    Sure enough, the rescue works... although the lady hadn't been told that the wendigo would dismember and eat (a) one of her attackers from the start of the book, and (b) her ex-husband, right in front of her children. Really angry, she tells the shaman that the deal is off--- and what a bad idea that is. Now the wendigo is after her, and as he leans on her (killing the family dog and stuffing its remains in the chimney), she learns that her boss lied and that the land is unavailable. Uh-oh indeed. The rest of the book is about how she'll try to escape the wendigo. Much death and mayhem will ensue.

    At that point things started to make less sense, even in the context of a horror story. See, the shaman insists that the lady must make good on her bargain, and that he really, really wants that piece of land--- nothing else will do. That's all fine and dandy, but with a wendigo at his beck and call he could simply force the owner to give him the land (and believe me, anybody would agree after seeing what the critter can do). Furthermore, the reason the shaman wants that piece of land in the first place is so he can call down a God of Thunder who's going to take revenge on the White Man for all he's done to the American Natives over the centuries. Okay, the motive is clear, but again when you've got a wendigo at your service, why bother with some other supernatural creature? All you have to do, in this novel, is to summon it in a five-minute ceremony and point it in the right direction, and it starts killing people (its salary being the people he eats). So one has to wonder why in heck the shaman wastes his time acting as a consulting detective when all he wants is to be this great revolutionary, and when he definitely has the means to carry his vision through.

    Anyway. Even the ending of the book is just like what you'd expect from a Hollywood horror movie. It's a pleasant enough thriller, good for a few hours fun, as long as you don't try to overanalyze it.
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  14. #1724
    *choke* Dan B. in the Underworld's Avatar
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    Over the last few weeks I've read a bunch of nonfiction dealing with the '30s, especially Nazi Germany -- Death in the City of Light: The Serial Killer of Nazi-Occupied Paris, In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin, Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power & Nazi Games: The Olympics of 1936, followed by a couple of books on the quest to track a couple of Nazis, Hunting Eichmann & Mengele: The Complete Story. Then came Campaign of the Century: Upton Sinclair's E.P.I.C. Race for Governor of California and the Birth of Media Politics, which at least occurred mostly in California, but again concerns events squarely in the mid-'30s (the election in question occurred in 1934).

    Not that I'm getting '30s-fatigued or anything -- far from it! -- but in casting about for something last night to read from my shelves, I came across Sharyn McCrumb's The Devil Amongst the Lawyers & decided to go with that. I liked her first 7 "Ballad" mysteries (as well as about 5 others of hers that I've read), & for a change they're all set in the here-&-now, albeit with backgrounds consisting of events decades or even centuries past. Except of course this one is based on an actual court case from ...

    ... 1935.

    No point in fighting it, I guess!
    Last edited by Dan B. in the Underworld; 03-04-2013 at 01:20 PM.
    I tend to split superhero comics fans into "People who like Krypto" and "People who don't like Krypto."
    Basically, if you miss the wonder of a dog flying around in a little Superman cape, you're in the wrong hobby.

    -- Reptisaurus!

  15. #1725
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Since the last time I was around...

    Grifter's Game by Lawrence Block

    Wish You Were Here by Tom Holt

    A Dog Called Demolition by Robert Rankin

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