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  1. #1606
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    The Man With the Getaway Face by Richard Stark.

    The second Parker novel finds the protagonist getting plastic surgery to help hide from The Outfit and doing a job with people he probably shouldn't because he needs the money.

  2. #1607
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    The Man With the Getaway Face by Richard Stark.

    The second Parker novel finds the protagonist getting plastic surgery to help hide from The Outfit and doing a job with people he probably shouldn't because he needs the money.
    I'm moving the Stark/Parker books closer to the top of my list. Recently I've started to feel like getting back into some hard-boiled stuff. First I just wanted to re-read some of the Chandler novels I haven't read for a long time, then it occurred to me that I should try some of both his and Hammett's short stories, none of which I've read yet. And of course that reminded me that I have a couple Jim Thompson novels lying around that I haven't gotten to, and that this might be a good time to give Spillane's Mike Hammer and Stark's Parker a try as well. So, as happens all too often, a simple idea of reading one or two books proliferates into a whole project that could take months.

    Right now, I'm reading one of Dickens's most famous books, Bleak House. Re-reading, I should say, but I remember very little from my first time round, 30+ years ago, except that I thought it was one of the best of his that I'd read up to that point.

  3. #1608
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    I'm moving the Stark/Parker books closer to the top of my list. Recently I've started to feel like getting back into some hard-boiled stuff. First I just wanted to re-read some of the Chandler novels I haven't read for a long time, then it occurred to me that I should try some of both his and Hammett's short stories, none of which I've read yet. And of course that reminded me that I have a couple Jim Thompson novels lying around that I haven't gotten to, and that this might be a good time to give Spillane's Mike Hammer and Stark's Parker a try as well. So, as happens all too often, a simple idea of reading one or two books proliferates into a whole project that could take months.
    The Parker novels are really enjoyable quick reads. Really fun. You'll hardly find a bigger Spillane fan than me this side of Max Collins.

    If you want to continue take a look at David Goodis and Charles Williams.

  4. #1609
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    The Parker novels are really enjoyable quick reads. Really fun. You'll hardly find a bigger Spillane fan than me this side of Max Collins.

    If you want to continue take a look at David Goodis and Charles Williams.
    Yeah, they're both on my list as well, but for now I'm leaving them on the back-burner. Charles Willeford was another one - any recommendations of first books to read for these?

  5. #1610
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    Yeah, they're both on my list as well, but for now I'm leaving them on the back-burner. Charles Willeford was another one - any recommendations of first books to read for these?
    The easiest place to start with Williams is A Touch of Death because it was reprinted by Hard Case Crime and is readily available. Otherwise probably The Hot Spot aka Hell Hath No Fury.

    For Goodis I'd say Street of No Return or Down There aka Shoot the Piano Player.

    Willeford is a great choice as well. Pick-Up and Cockfighter are both good early paperbacks. I haven't read his later Hoke Moseley books. They're on my extraordinarily long list of books to read.

  6. #1611
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    The easiest place to start with Williams is A Touch of Death because it was reprinted by Hard Case Crime and is readily available. Otherwise probably The Hot Spot aka Hell Hath No Fury.

    For Goodis I'd say Street of No Return or Down There aka Shoot the Piano Player.

    Willeford is a great choice as well. Pick-Up and Cockfighter are both good early paperbacks. I haven't read his later Hoke Moseley books. They're on my extraordinarily long list of books to read.
    Thanks, that helps.

    Coincidentally, Bleak House is sometimes talked about as the first English detective novel, though it's really more like the first one to feature a fairly prominent detective character, Inspector Bucket (haven't gotten to this part yet, but it's starting to come back to me as I get further into the book).

  7. #1612
    Elder Member Libaax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    The Parker novels are really enjoyable quick reads. Really fun. You'll hardly find a bigger Spillane fan than me this side of Max Collins.

    If you want to continue take a look at David Goodis and Charles Williams.
    Are you re-reading Parker books or you have never read them before ? They are my fav noir series, criminal noir/heist story is seldom as well done as Richard Stark books. They are quick reads but book 15 was 300 pages and thick enough to be two Parker books.
    Pull List:
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    American Vampire,Animal Man,Swamp Thing
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  8. #1613
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libaax View Post
    Are you re-reading Parker books or you have never read them before ? They are my fav noir series, criminal noir/heist story is seldom as well done as Richard Stark books. They are quick reads but book 15 was 300 pages and thick enough to be two Parker books.
    I'm re-reading the first half-dozen or so, but it's the first time in probably 20 years. I haven't read any of the later ones. They're being judiciously interspersed with my other reading so I don't O.D.

  9. #1614
    Elder Member Libaax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    I'm re-reading the first half-dozen or so, but it's the first time in probably 20 years. I haven't read any of the later ones. They're being judiciously interspersed with my other reading so I don't O.D.
    What do you think about Parker? His cold-blooded emotional self has been written alot of, I have read NYT articles trying to understand his codes,emotional less life,work. The world of only crooks that he lives in. I have read the first 15 books in 2009-2011, saving the rest for a bit later to prolong the enjoyment of reading the mean lean prose,Parker himself.

    My fav literary character is between The OP and Parker. Both are really work ethic,live only for their works,mean types that say much about their writers and me liking them.

    I shouldnt have doubted you Slam with reading Parker/Stark, you are the PI,Noir reader i hope to become :)
    Pull List:
    The Walking Dead,Fatale,Near Death,Storm Dogs,Happy,BPRD,XO-Manowar
    American Vampire,Animal Man,Swamp Thing
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  10. #1615
    Idaho Spuds Slam_Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libaax View Post
    What do you think about Parker? His cold-blooded emotional self has been written alot of, I have read NYT articles trying to understand his codes,emotional less life,work. The world of only crooks that he lives in. I have read the first 15 books in 2009-2011, saving the rest for a bit later to prolong the enjoyment of reading the mean lean prose,Parker himself.

    My fav literary character is between The OP and Parker. Both are really work ethic,live only for their works,mean types that say much about their writers and me liking them.

    I shouldnt have doubted you Slam with reading Parker/Stark, you are the PI,Noir reader i hope to become :)

    Parker is interesting in that he's a protagonist who isn't a hero and really doesn't even qualify as an anti-hero. He has few, if any, redeemable characteristics. His codes, essentially, are in place simply to keep him safe and out of prison. That he doesn't turn on his partners is more because he may need them in a later heist than because he has any concern about them as people.

    I think he's the ultimate end and distillation of the Ned Beaumont character in The Glass Key. Beaumont was very much the anti-hero and wasn't the flawed knight that Sam Spade or The Op were. He was a criminal who retained a thin veneer of legitimacy because of his ties to the political powers of the time. Parker does away with that thin veneer and is pure avarice incarnate. Great character and great reading.

  11. #1616
    One of Archard's Agents Amacent's Avatar
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    ^ I've been meaning to buy Darwyn Cooke's adaptation of Parker: The Hunter but I had no desire in reading the source material at all until now. Thanks to your posts I'm definitely going to add the novel to my cart the next time I splurge on Amazon.com.

  12. #1617
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    Soulless by Gail Carriger.

    Wasn't expecting much of it but it turned out to be quite an excellent read. Alternative Victorian world in which supernatural creatures such as werewolves for example are actually a reality and accepted by the society. (very few of them though, it helps)

    The main character is a gal named Alexia who is without a soul. Particularity who gives her the power to remove any supernatural faculty from a person as long as she touches him/her.

    Very funny, very well written, the dialogs are brilliant and often hilarious and Alexia is a wonderfully entertaining main protagonist. It's the first of a series who seems kinda long, don't remember exactly how much there is but at least 4 or 5.

    Definitely worth the read. You're not going to regret it.

  13. #1618
    Elder Member Libaax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slam_Bradley View Post
    Parker is interesting in that he's a protagonist who isn't a hero and really doesn't even qualify as an anti-hero. He has few, if any, redeemable characteristics. His codes, essentially, are in place simply to keep him safe and out of prison. That he doesn't turn on his partners is more because he may need them in a later heist than because he has any concern about them as people.

    I think he's the ultimate end and distillation of the Ned Beaumont character in The Glass Key. Beaumont was very much the anti-hero and wasn't the flawed knight that Sam Spade or The Op were. He was a criminal who retained a thin veneer of legitimacy because of his ties to the political powers of the time. Parker does away with that thin veneer and is pure avarice incarnate. Great character and great reading.
    I have seen critics analysing Parker calling him No-hero because it fits and he is not as you say an anti-hero. Exactly the way you describe his better sides, his loyalty to partners is selfish that he needs good partners to do his heist jobs, not get in jail. Some fans try to fool themselves his codes makes him somewhat heroic but we remember him killing an innocent women in The Hunter just because she caught him using her place while he was after the revenge on his old partner. He is not just sick and he is so well done how he goes from to pro to cold emotionless killer when you get in his way. The lack of that thin veneer as you say is why i find him so wonderful to read and spend time in his twisted mind,world.

    Westlake is Hammett fan as i remember, he must have studied his forerunners. Glass Key is one of few Hammett books i havent read and i have heard alot of interesting stuff about Ned Beaumont.
    Pull List:
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    American Vampire,Animal Man,Swamp Thing
    Daredevil, Winter Soldier,Indestructible Hulk

  14. #1619
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    Quote Originally Posted by Castel View Post
    It's the first of a series who seems kinda long, don't remember exactly how much there is but at least 4 or 5.
    Five. Soulless, Changeless, Blameless, Heartless, and Timeless. That said, I think there're two spinoff series coming down the pike.

    The returns diminish the farther along you go, but they're still charming reads and Alexia's voice is always fun.
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  15. #1620
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    I just started this one:

    Mystery of Mysteries : Is Evolution a Social Construction by Michael Ruse

    Only read the first chapter so far, but it seems to be a good balanced examination of the two 20th-century writers Ruse deems most influential on our views of science, Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn.

    Ruse's project is to fairly examine Kuhn's claims of science as being partially created by cultural imperatives, as against Popper's conception that culture had no meaningful impact on the dynamic of science.

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