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  1. #1
    Mild-Mannered Reporter
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    Default CBR: BCC: The "Wednesday Comics" Panel

    "Wednesday Comics" editor, Mark Chiarello, gathered a panel of the experimental series' contributors to discuss and answer questions about format, collaboration and the potential sequel to the newsprint hit of 2009.


    Full article here.

  2. #2
    Mark Brodersen hondobrode's Avatar
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    Can't wait for the sequel !

    I love the character of the Demon but I can't stand reading that dialogue !

    Ellison / Simonson Dr. Fate sounds great !!
    I am what I am and that's all what I am

  3. #3
    Elder Member The Batman's Avatar
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    Yeah, if they can get the same level of talent to bring the same level of energy I'll absolutely be up for another round of Wednesday Comics.

    Along those lines, details regarding how the first series will be collected can be found here.

  4. #4
    Star Blazer Will.S's Avatar
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    One fan asked about the inclusion of the "Superman" strip in "USA Today," which Chiarello considered one of the most successful aspects of the strip in terms of raising cultural awareness.

    Chiarello said the project was so successful that it had some opportunities for even wider circulation than in just comic shops, which demonstrated outside interest in the series on a more corporate level.

    "We came this close to getting the entire insert into the 'New York Daily News,'" said Chiarello, who pointed out how good the paper's circulation would have been for expanding comics awareness.


    Best news from the panel.
    Last edited by Will.S; 10-13-2009 at 03:30 PM.

  5. #5
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    Simonson discussed his choice to have the Demon speak in iambic pentameter rather than couplets, a move some Demon fans were critical of until they realized why he made that choice to avoid the character sounding like he was speaking in limericks.
    Okay, I've seen several CBR pieces make reference to the Demon's iambic pentameter as if it's an original idea that Simonson came up with all by himself.

    It isn't.

    Alan Moore had the Demon speaking in iambic pentameter 20 years ago in Swamp Thing.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thad View Post
    Okay, I've seen several CBR pieces make reference to the Demon's iambic pentameter as if it's an original idea that Simonson came up with all by himself.

    It isn't.

    Alan Moore had the Demon speaking in iambic pentameter 20 years ago in Swamp Thing.
    Hello, Thad.

    I read the tone of your note as slightly snarky though of course, I could be mistaken about that. The 'Okay' at the beginning and the 'all by himself' lend your post a somewhat condescending tone, intentional or not. And the 'It isn't.' suggests that there's no room for discussion. At least, that's how I understand your post.

    But I'm game to answer you in good faith because I enjoyed writing the Demon and the strip.

    I don't think your answer entertains the possibility of two writers reaching the same idea independently. Whether this is an idea you haven't considered or think is too 'coincidental' to be believed or something else, I don't know. I do know that you and I haven't discussed the Demon or his manner of speaking so you wouldn't have come to any firsthand knowledge of why I chose to write the character as I did.

    I've never read any of Alan's Demon writing. I've never read all of Alan's Swamp Thing and had forgotten that he wrote the Demon in the strip though I probably knew it once. That said, I've always had the impression that Alan wrote the character in rhymed verse. But that's an impression based on what I'd gleaned over the years, not on any actual firsthand knowledge. And of course, that's a dangerous way to draw conclusions.

    In fact, I originally considered writing the Demon in verse because I thought Alan had. But I didn't go back to the source and check largely because I concluded very quickly that if I tried rhymed verse, I'd likely create a Demon whose dialogue sounded like doggerel. I did mention limericks at the Wednesday Comics panel in Baltimore, mainly because it's funnier than doggerel, but doggerel was my real concern. (I have thought since that if I ever write the Demon in some sort of comedic story, I might try limericks with his dialogue as a form of parody).

    I opted for iambic pentameter for two reasons. The first is that I thought it would give a formal quality to the Demon's speech. And as iambic pentameter is so closely associated with Shakespeare, I hoped such dialogue would suggest the character's longevity. Not that he's exactly ancient in terms of years in his existence on Earth, but he's pretty old. I threw in a few archaic words to emphasize that point.

    And secondly, there is a magical quality about poetry. Because of its form, it makes connections and opens up ideas that the same thought expressed in prose can't reach. Frequently in fiction of course, spells and incantations actually are written as poetry. Again, I didn't want to write doggerel (and this is no claim that I wrote brilliant poetry in any case), but blank verse seemed a nice compromise between poetry and prose. It both echoes the age of the character and hints at his magical qualities.

    I have no idea why Alan chose to write the Demon in iambic pentameter. But those are the reasons I did, not because I thought or realized I was following in Alan's footsteps.

    Best/Walter

    PS: I also think that the blank verse I wrote in the strip, like most poetry for me, is best read aloud. I should probably have put that in as a stage direction. <g>

    PPS: And in fact, the Demon's very last line in answer to a query from Catwoman is NOT in iambic pentameter, deliberately leaving open the question of whether or not the Demon MUST speak in blank verse or simply chooses to do so. A notion I like a lot.

  7. #7
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    dear mr. simonson:
    please don't interject reason into this.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ben c View Post
    dear mr. simonson:
    please don't interject reason into this.
    LOL. I'll try to restrain myself in future.

    Best/Walter

  9. #9
    Ben L FunkyGreenJerusalem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Simonson View Post
    PPS: And in fact, the Demon's very last line in answer to a query from Catwoman is NOT in iambic pentameter, deliberately leaving open the question of whether or not the Demon MUST speak in blank verse or simply chooses to do so. A notion I like a lot.
    I'm pretty sure it was mentioned in Sandman that he did it because it was the 'in-fad' in hell at the time.

    And some where else that it was a way Demons could tell their rank, from how they spoke their words.

    I think 'he just likes talking that way' fits in quite well around those.
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  10. #10
    Fin Apologist Ian J.N.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Simonson View Post
    I opted for iambic pentameter for two reasons. The first is that I thought it would give a formal quality to the Demon's speech. And as iambic pentameter is so closely associated with Shakespeare, I hoped such dialogue would suggest the character's longevity. Not that he's exactly ancient in terms of years in his existence on Earth, but he's pretty old. I threw in a few archaic words to emphasize that point.

    And secondly, there is a magical quality about poetry. Because of its form, it makes connections and opens up ideas that the same thought expressed in prose can't reach. Frequently in fiction of course, spells and incantations actually are written as poetry. Again, I didn't want to write doggerel (and this is no claim that I wrote brilliant poetry in any case), but blank verse seemed a nice compromise between poetry and prose. It both echoes the age of the character and hints at his magical qualities.
    I don't know who originated the Demon's iambic pentameter, but I enjoyed its usage in Wednesday Comics. I've always associated the Demon with Shakespeare's Caliban, so iambic pentameter felt very right for the character.

    Still, I can't help but wonder what he'd sound like in dirty limerick.

  11. #11
    Fin Apologist Ian J.N.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FunkyGreenJerusalem View Post
    And some where else that it was a way Demons could tell their rank, from how they spoke their words.
    I thought that was in Moore's Swamp Thing. Etrigan held the rank of rhyming demon or something.

  12. #12
    Ben L FunkyGreenJerusalem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian J.N. View Post
    I thought that was in Moore's Swamp Thing. Etrigan held the rank of rhyming demon or something.
    Probably.

    But he did speak in rhyme there and not 'iambic pentameter' didn't he?
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  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Simonson View Post
    Hello, Thad.

    I read the tone of your note as slightly snarky though of course, I could be mistaken about that. The 'Okay' at the beginning and the 'all by himself' lend your post a somewhat condescending tone, intentional or not. And the 'It isn't.' suggests that there's no room for discussion. At least, that's how I understand your post.

    But I'm game to answer you in good faith because I enjoyed writing the Demon and the strip.

    I don't think your answer entertains the possibility of two writers reaching the same idea independently. Whether this is an idea you haven't considered or think is too 'coincidental' to be believed or something else, I don't know. I do know that you and I haven't discussed the Demon or his manner of speaking so you wouldn't have come to any firsthand knowledge of why I chose to write the character as I did.

    I've never read any of Alan's Demon writing. I've never read all of Alan's Swamp Thing and had forgotten that he wrote the Demon in the strip though I probably knew it once. That said, I've always had the impression that Alan wrote the character in rhymed verse. But that's an impression based on what I'd gleaned over the years, not on any actual firsthand knowledge. And of course, that's a dangerous way to draw conclusions.

    In fact, I originally considered writing the Demon in verse because I thought Alan had. But I didn't go back to the source and check largely because I concluded very quickly that if I tried rhymed verse, I'd likely create a Demon whose dialogue sounded like doggerel. I did mention limericks at the Wednesday Comics panel in Baltimore, mainly because it's funnier than doggerel, but doggerel was my real concern. (I have thought since that if I ever write the Demon in some sort of comedic story, I might try limericks with his dialogue as a form of parody).

    I opted for iambic pentameter for two reasons. The first is that I thought it would give a formal quality to the Demon's speech. And as iambic pentameter is so closely associated with Shakespeare, I hoped such dialogue would suggest the character's longevity. Not that he's exactly ancient in terms of years in his existence on Earth, but he's pretty old. I threw in a few archaic words to emphasize that point.

    And secondly, there is a magical quality about poetry. Because of its form, it makes connections and opens up ideas that the same thought expressed in prose can't reach. Frequently in fiction of course, spells and incantations actually are written as poetry. Again, I didn't want to write doggerel (and this is no claim that I wrote brilliant poetry in any case), but blank verse seemed a nice compromise between poetry and prose. It both echoes the age of the character and hints at his magical qualities.

    I have no idea why Alan chose to write the Demon in iambic pentameter. But those are the reasons I did, not because I thought or realized I was following in Alan's footsteps.

    Best/Walter

    PS: I also think that the blank verse I wrote in the strip, like most poetry for me, is best read aloud. I should probably have put that in as a stage direction. <g>

    PPS: And in fact, the Demon's very last line in answer to a query from Catwoman is NOT in iambic pentameter, deliberately leaving open the question of whether or not the Demon MUST speak in blank verse or simply chooses to do so. A notion I like a lot.
    Walt,

    Love your work. Loved the Demon/Catwoman strip. Can't wait for your next long form project (any word on when that might be completed? Over 100 pages of Simonson-y goodness at once, yowza!).

    Please draw the Dr. Fate strip. Please, somehow, someway, sneak Orion or any of the new gods into something you do in the future at DC.

    Please keep writing.

    Hope all is well! And thanks for giving us so many great stories!

  14. #14
    2x Postmania Champion Gryphon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Simonson View Post
    Hello, Thad.

    I read the tone of your note as slightly snarky though of course, I could be mistaken about that. The 'Okay' at the beginning and the 'all by himself' lend your post a somewhat condescending tone, intentional or not. And the 'It isn't.' suggests that there's no room for discussion. At least, that's how I understand your post.

    But I'm game to answer you in good faith because I enjoyed writing the Demon and the strip.

    I don't think your answer entertains the possibility of two writers reaching the same idea independently. Whether this is an idea you haven't considered or think is too 'coincidental' to be believed or something else, I don't know. I do know that you and I haven't discussed the Demon or his manner of speaking so you wouldn't have come to any firsthand knowledge of why I chose to write the character as I did.

    I've never read any of Alan's Demon writing. I've never read all of Alan's Swamp Thing and had forgotten that he wrote the Demon in the strip though I probably knew it once. That said, I've always had the impression that Alan wrote the character in rhymed verse. But that's an impression based on what I'd gleaned over the years, not on any actual firsthand knowledge. And of course, that's a dangerous way to draw conclusions.

    In fact, I originally considered writing the Demon in verse because I thought Alan had. But I didn't go back to the source and check largely because I concluded very quickly that if I tried rhymed verse, I'd likely create a Demon whose dialogue sounded like doggerel. I did mention limericks at the Wednesday Comics panel in Baltimore, mainly because it's funnier than doggerel, but doggerel was my real concern. (I have thought since that if I ever write the Demon in some sort of comedic story, I might try limericks with his dialogue as a form of parody).

    I opted for iambic pentameter for two reasons. The first is that I thought it would give a formal quality to the Demon's speech. And as iambic pentameter is so closely associated with Shakespeare, I hoped such dialogue would suggest the character's longevity. Not that he's exactly ancient in terms of years in his existence on Earth, but he's pretty old. I threw in a few archaic words to emphasize that point.

    And secondly, there is a magical quality about poetry. Because of its form, it makes connections and opens up ideas that the same thought expressed in prose can't reach. Frequently in fiction of course, spells and incantations actually are written as poetry. Again, I didn't want to write doggerel (and this is no claim that I wrote brilliant poetry in any case), but blank verse seemed a nice compromise between poetry and prose. It both echoes the age of the character and hints at his magical qualities.

    I have no idea why Alan chose to write the Demon in iambic pentameter. But those are the reasons I did, not because I thought or realized I was following in Alan's footsteps.

    Best/Walter

    PS: I also think that the blank verse I wrote in the strip, like most poetry for me, is best read aloud. I should probably have put that in as a stage direction. <g>

    PPS: And in fact, the Demon's very last line in answer to a query from Catwoman is NOT in iambic pentameter, deliberately leaving open the question of whether or not the Demon MUST speak in blank verse or simply chooses to do so. A notion I like a lot.
    wow,

    you are awesome
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