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  1. #76
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    People in white coats (science cartoons, updated daily) | Art Blog

  2. #77
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    That "you're not sympathetic" line is just brilliant.
    People in white coats (science cartoons, updated daily) | Art Blog

  3. #78
    world of yesterday benday-dot's Avatar
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    Thanks for the extended Pratt feature RR. Very nice stuff. He would seem to be a kindred spirit of Alex Toth.

  4. #79
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    Going by these samples, I think I agree with the idea that Pratt's art looks better in b&w. Is there usually a choice, or did he just do some stories in colour and others in b&w?

    [edit:]Although, I must say that one water-coloured drawing RR posted is very nice indeed.

    Oh, and thanks Sir Tim. I like the clear line style, especially when the character design isn't too cartoony or exaggerated too far into caricature. Ted Benoit's stuff looks very nice. And Jacobs's Blake and Mortimer is something I've long meant to get into.
    Last edited by berk; 09-08-2009 at 08:15 PM.

  5. #80
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    I agree, benday-dot; Pratt and Toth do seem to be kindred souls. (I noticed when reading Toth's Zorro, which Scott had recommended).

    Regarding color, berk, I don't know. The early Corto Maltese stories in Pif Gadget were done in B&W (as all adventure strips were), so there was little choice. They got colored when they got reprinted in Tintin, but I'm not sure that the artist handled that task.

    The most recent books, since they leave a lot of room for color (far fewer heavy black blocks) sugest that they were intended to be colored right from the start.
    People in white coats (science cartoons, updated daily) | Art Blog

  6. #81
    Junior Member Beria's Avatar
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    Great thread!

    I've been reading a lot of Franquin's Spirou lately. They are really great comics. It's a pity so little of it has been translated into english (I read the norwegian translations). I prefer the 50's stufff, my favourite being La repaire de la Murene.

  7. #82
    Forgive Friedrich's Debt Aaron Kashtan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roquefort Raider View Post
    Yoko Tsuno I liked a lot. Creator Leloup has a very crisp and clean line, an oustanding sense of design, and his stories alternate between mysteries here on Earth and adventures in outer space. It's aimed at the 12-17 crowd. Yoko herself is a pretty original character, eschewing stereotypes as early as 1970.
    As a result of this post, I just started reading a Yoko Tsuno album -- one of the two that were published by Catalan in the '80s, not one of the recent Comcat volumes. I'm very impressed by Leloup's humor and his design sense.
    Aaron Kashtan | Formerly Sir Tim Drake
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  8. #83
    Forgive Friedrich's Debt Aaron Kashtan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Tim Drake View Post
    As a result of this post, I just started reading a Yoko Tsuno album -- one of the two that were published by Catalan in the '80s, not one of the recent Comcat volumes. I'm very impressed by Leloup's humor and his design sense.
    I finished the book. It was highly enjoyable.

    Leloup reminds me of Russ Manning in that his machinery is elegantly designed, but also looks like it could actually work. Leloup's machines are made up of identifiable parts that all seem to have a specific function. He gives the reader enough visual information to imagine how the machine might have been built. In contrast, when an artist like Kirby draws machines, they look really impressive, but it's not clear how they work or how the parts fit together.

    EDIT: Here's an example:

    Last edited by Aaron Kashtan; 09-14-2009 at 04:11 PM.
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  9. #84

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    Leloup did one book where Yoko goes to Rothenburg, which has been called the best-preserved medieval town in Europe. Leloup's research was impeccable. I've visited Rothenburg, and reading his comic is like walking the streets there.

    The book's title is "On The Edge of Life." I see it's available from Amazon for $10, used copies for under $5.

  10. #85
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    Just started reading this recent BD, Tiffany, by Yann & Herval. Nice artwork, very much in the clear line tradition, and I'm impressed with the story-telling so far. I'm only about half-way through the first of the two voumes that have appeared so far, but I can already see I'll want to follow this series if it carries on.

    Browsing the Fantagraphics website a few days ago, I came across some English translations of a couple of books that I was immediately attracted to: "West Coast Blues," by Jacques Tardi & Jean-Patrick Manchette, and "You are There," by Tardi & Jean-Claude Forest. The original French titles were, respectively, "Le Petit bleu de la côte ouest" and "Ici Même." Anyone familiar with either of these? I gather they appeared sometime during the 70s to early 80s. They both look fantastic, visually, and I liked what I read of the story-premises as well. I'm tempted to grab the new English versions, but I'd prefer to track down the French if they're readily available (need all the practice I can get). I'll have to have a look at Renaud-Bray; already had a good experience ordering the Tiffany's (2-for1 deal!) and the first Largo Winch volume, which I haven't read yet (thanks RR - this looks like it might become my default site for French books & BD).

  11. #86
    Hardcover addict dupont2005's Avatar
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    i love the artwork and subject matter in a lot of euro comics. i wish more were translated. i really wish we could get all the volumes of jeremiah in english
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  12. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    Browsing the Fantagraphics website a few days ago, I came across some English translations of a couple of books that I was immediately attracted to: "West Coast Blues," by Jacques Tardi & Jean-Patrick Manchette, and "You are There," by Tardi & Jean-Claude Forest. The original French titles were, respectively, "Le Petit bleu de la côte ouest" and "Ici Même." Anyone familiar with either of these? I gather they appeared sometime during the 70s to early 80s. They both look fantastic, visually, and I liked what I read of the story-premises as well. I'm tempted to grab the new English versions, but I'd prefer to track down the French if they're readily available (need all the practice I can get). I'll have to have a look at Renaud-Bray; already had a good experience ordering the Tiffany's (2-for1 deal!) and the first Largo Winch volume, which I haven't read yet (thanks RR - this looks like it might become my default site for French books & BD).
    Herval's work is lovely.

    Tardi's detective stuff is good. You may be able to find it in French at French Amazon: www.amazon.fr
    I order comics from them every once in awhile. Even with shipping, the prices are often better than ordering European comics from domestic (American) sellers.

  13. #88
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    Default 1975, the start of a great period.

    Here's a sample of what could be found in issue #15 of the 30th year of the weekly journal Tintin. It's a fair cross-section of what was happening in 1975 at the Éditions du Lombard, a Belgian powerhouse when it came to comics. Weekly comics such as Tintin were a springboard for new stories, which were then collected in albums if judged popular enough. Dupuis had the same set-up with the weekly Spirou and Dargaud with the journal Pilote.

    All of these journals offered a mix of adventure and humor strips. I'd say that Spirou aimed at an audience that was ever so slightly younger than Tintin, which in turn aimed at one slightly younger than Pilote. (That trend would become more apparent in the late 70s when Pilote started featuring more and more R-rated content).

    So, back to this issue of Tintin. This issue starts with the begining of a new Bernard Prince adventure, who is appropriately featured on the cover. Prince is a standard adventurer whose sole reason to be is to give the authors the opportunity to craft adventure yarns set in exotic locales. He used to be some kind of cop in his early days, but later on became the owner of a small boat with which he travels the world delivering what must be extremely small cargoes, considering the diminutive size of the boat.

    Prince is accompanied by a Captain Haddock-like sidekick, a red-headed and bearded sailor with a rotten temper and a heart of gold, as well as a serious drinking problem. With them is also a young orphan and a cub bear, both rescued in previous adventures. Bernard Prince will, in time, be embroiled in South American and African revolutions, drug traffic in northern Canada, an escape from a volcanic eruption in the southern seas, and a cleverly-mounted murder attempt in France. (The voyage aspect works, that's for sure).

    The script is by Greg, creator of countless quality series and ex-editor in chief of Tintin; the art is by a young Hermann who would later be known in the US as the author of Jeremiah.



    Even today I am impressed by the amount of detail Hermann puts in his work, and by the lightness and freedom of his brush work.
    People in white coats (science cartoons, updated daily) | Art Blog

  14. #89
    Modus omnibus in rebus Roquefort Raider's Avatar
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    Modeste & Pompon follow in a one-pager. These characters were handled by many different authors over the years, and they never quite developed a real personality. Here, the strip would work the same way even if it wasn't part of a series. Artist Griffo is clearly influenced by Franquin, and shows that he's quite a capable cartoonist. (The joke is kind of dated, but hey... that's from 35 years ago...)

    People in white coats (science cartoons, updated daily) | Art Blog

  15. #90
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    Buddy Longway was in its early days as a series, as this is the end of only his third adventure. Longway is the creation of Swiss writer-artist Derib, who had a passion for drawing horses and the American west. This series would become one of the most beloved of its time, earning numerous prizes for its realistic, humanist treatment of history. It's also interesting in that it did not have a status quo that's returned to again and again; the series progressed in time just as real life does (if not necessarily in real-time). We saw Buddy Longway fall in love and marry a young Lakota, Chinook. They built a cabin and had a boy; they faced some hostile natives, some nasty white men, some cruel military officers; they also met a lot of good people from both sides of the cultural divide. They went through life, basically, as a normal family would in such conditions. Their adult son later joined an Indian rebellion and was killed; and Buddy and Chinook, tragically, finally died in a very realistic anti-climax at the hand of a violent brute with whom they had had problems in the past and who, typically, had to blame someone for his self-inflicted problems. Despite this depressing ending, this was by all accounts a great series.

    Here, still in the early days, Buddy and Chinook's cabin was taken over during the winter by three bandits. The family was made to work for the trio, until a falling-out caused the death of on of the crooks, and the other two left -taking the boy with them as a hostage. Buddy went after them, but so did a surprising ally : a wolf that the Longways had adopted as a cub, and who had a little while before gone back to a wild pack. As in any good Disney movie, the faithful animal had not forgotten his young friend.

    People in white coats (science cartoons, updated daily) | Art Blog

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