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  1. #1
    Iain'tgottimetobleed RaggtyMan's Avatar
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    Default Is The Invisibles book any good?

    I read the first issue but can't tell if its worth it.

  2. #2
    Member geordiesteve's Avatar
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    In my personal opinion, no. I bought the first trade and I didn't like it. I really struggled to get through it to be honest. I know Morrison sometimes writes stuff that is very out there, and that can be good, but this didn't track for me and I sold it on in the end. I think Morrison has done some good stuff, and he is talented, but I didn't enjoy this at all.

    I'm sure someone else will tell you why they thought it was wicked and kick ass etc.
    If you look after the fans, they will look after you.

  3. #3
    Over the Edge Karl H's Avatar
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    I have just finished the final trade and on balance I really enjoyed it. Don't get me wrong there's some 'out there' stuff there and it takes a few reads but overall it's a satisfying read. There's also a very good notes book called "the misinformation guide to the invisibles" or something like that.

  4. #4
    Say WHAT?!?!?!? FanboyStranger's Avatar
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    The Invisibles is certainly worth it, but I'm not sure reading in chronological order is the best way to go. I'd recommend starting with volume 2 (Bloody Hell in America, Counting to None, and Kissing Mr. Quimper), then going back and working through volume 1. The problem with vol. 1 is that the second story arc is quite challenging, a rare moment in comics that the creators actually overestimate the intelligence of their readers. You need to bring a lot to that party, and it's somewhat disjointed to begin with. At the time, so many people fled the book that it was in danger of cancellation, so Morrison reigned himself in a bit, which would bear fruit in the latter issues of volume 1. Plus,the addition of Phil Jimenez' art complemented the story very well.

    If you read volume 2 first, you'll have a better sense of the characters, perhaps even caring about them somewhat. Then when you return to volume one, it will read more like backhistory, which will flesh the series out more. Are some things spoiled? Of course, but not enough to ruin my enjoyment of the story, at least.

    However, don't touch volume 3 until you've read volumes 1 & 2, or you'll be lost completely.

  5. #5
    Still Kisses With Saliva filthysize's Avatar
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    I liked it. A lot.

  6. #6
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    Its really personal choice.
    If you enjoy counter-cultures with pysche elements, I'd definetely reccomend it.
    And, I agree Morrison does overestimate the intelligence of the readers.

  7. #7
    A Spider Darkly Headhunter's Avatar
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    I have/read the first 2 trades, they're challenging but ultimately too weird for me.

  8. #8
    Say WHAT?!?!?!? FanboyStranger's Avatar
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    When I said that Morrison overestimated his readers, I meant only in the second story arc. You needed to bring in some outside knowledge on the Shelleys, Byron, deSade and his works, plus a lot of the elements seem disjointed until you realize it's the argument rather than the story that ties everything together. Even Morrison admits that it was a trainwreck, and that's where most people who dislike the book tend to cast it aside as pretentious crap, somewhat understandably. For the most part, however, I'd argue that most of the ideas presented afterwards throughout the series were presented fairly clearly, either in the story or in Invisibles Ink. The trades unfortunately do not reprint the letter pages, so you're stuck on some of that, but Anarchy for the Masses does help fill in a lot.

    I also don't see why people dislike vol. 3 so much, except for the art discrepancies in the last arc, which were corrected for the trade. I find the "Karmageddon" arc with Sean Phillips to be one of the best arcs (and most important) in the entire series. Nothing really comes out of left field either, although it certainly helps to reread the entire series before you plunge into it. Plus, the last few pages of the series with Dane's proclamation that "our sentence is up" is probably the best and most fitting ending that any Vertigo series ever had.

    But then again, I love the book.

  9. #9
    More Donald than Charlie stealthwise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FanboyStranger View Post
    When I said that Morrison overestimated his readers, I meant only in the second story arc. You needed to bring in some outside knowledge on the Shelleys, Byron, deSade and his works, plus a lot of the elements seem disjointed until you realize it's the argument rather than the story that ties everything together. Even Morrison admits that it was a trainwreck, and that's where most people who dislike the book tend to cast it aside as pretentious crap, somewhat understandably. For the most part, however, I'd argue that most of the ideas presented afterwards throughout the series were presented fairly clearly, either in the story or in Invisibles Ink. The trades unfortunately do not reprint the letter pages, so you're stuck on some of that, but Anarchy for the Masses does help fill in a lot.
    Heh. I dug the book, but gave up on it after the second trade because, quite frankly, I found that there were other titles that demanded my money and attention. I read up to the end of the second book, but as a student of English literature, I understood nearly everything that was going on with the Shelleys, Byron and DeSade, but just honestly didn't find it compelling.
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  10. #10
    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
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    Invisibles is good for the first half of the first trade and all of the next five, but the 7th and final trade just confused the hell out of me. I'd find it hard to fully recommend it with that confusing ending.

    (and as for the 2nd arc - it wasn't just Morrison's fault. Jill Thompson's art in that storyline is abysmal)

    Dan

  11. #11
    loves meter maids sgt pepper's Avatar
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    If you gave up on the first volume, I highly recommend that you try the second volume which is set in America. It is not as dense or difficult to work through as the first volume (though I loved much of the first volume), it has twice as much ass kicking, and it's full of mystery and clever surprises. And it's still got plenty of Morrison's mysticism/weirdness to go around (much of which Morrison apparently actually believes in, unless he's just pulling one over on us with his public persona).

  12. #12

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    The first volume is amongst the best comics ever. Vol 2 and 3 are alright but nowhere near as good. So vol 1 #1 through 26 is the way to go whatever trades that represents.

  13. #13
    jayeffscene
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    It is definetely not a book you can just read a few issues of. One of the most confusing books I've ever read. But yes, i'd say it's worth it. I hear that 'the filth' is even more confusing.

  14. #14
    Crusader of Justice dancj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayeffscene View Post
    It is definetely not a book you can just read a few issues of. One of the most confusing books I've ever read. But yes, i'd say it's worth it. I hear that 'the filth' is even more confusing.
    The filth is much less confusing than the final volume of The Invisibles, and probably on a par with much of the rest. Personally I think it benefits from being shorter and more coherent.

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