Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 54
  1. #1
    Moderator Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    23,020

    Default Top 15 Spider-Man Characters

    To celebrate my 2000 posts here/ complete lack of a life, I’ve decided to do a countdown of the 15 greatest Spider-man characters. The list includes villains (including three Goblins), supporting cast members, and the main man himself. Some of them have had greater success outside of the Spider-Man books, but they all debuted in either Amazing Spider-Man, or Amazing Fantasy #15. I doubt there’s much suspense over who #1 will be, and I admit that some worthy characters are kept off the list by more worthy characters, but I'm arrogant enough to think it's a good list. So without further ado....

    15. Flash Thompson

    First Appearance: Amazing Fantasy #15
    Creators: Stan Lee/ Steve Ditko
    Flash Thompson started out as one of Peter’s greatest tormentors, with the delicious irony that he was also the world’s biggest Spider-Man fan. As far as brilliant concepts go, that’s right up there with the Clark Kent/ Lois Lane/ Superman love triangle. Then Stan Lee did something rare, and had the character mature into one of Peter’s best friends, sending him to the military, where he developed into a better man. Later highlights include his battle with alcoholism in JM Dematteis’s Spectacular Spider-Man run. This character isn’t used effectively enough by current writers, but has a tremendous amouny of potential.

    Recommended Reading:
    Amazing Spider-Man #5
    Flash Thompson disguises himself as Spider-Man, and gets abducted by Doctor Doom. The highlight of this issue may just be the way Peter Parker savors his opponent's trouble. Adapted into one of the first episodes of the 90s Fox cartoon.
    Amazing Spider-Man #17-19
    This storyline is the best example of Flash's love of Spider-Man, as he convinces Spider-Man to come to a meeting of his fan club, and defends his hero after Spider-Man is accused of being a coward, even though it earns him a severe beating.
    Webspinners #7-9
    Peter Parker, and Flash Thompson compete for the same girl for the prom. Perhaps the high point of the Webspinners anthology. Revealed a more desperate side to the character.
    Spider-Man: Blue
    An excellent retelling of the best of Lee/ Romita's run, this story probably has a better rendition of Flash's decision to join the military (as it's no longer possible for Flash to get drafted.)
    Amazing Spider-Man #107-108
    A favorite of John Romita Sr, this storyline finds Flash Thompson dealing with incredible guilt, as enemies from Vietnam want to execute him for war crimes.
    Spectacular Spider-Man #-1, 241-250
    Flash Thompon’s battle with alcohol, containing both the lowest points of his life, the beginning of his recovery, and the introduction of his father.
    Peter Parker Spider-Man #31
    There’s a perfect three page scene in which Flash Thompson comforts a distraught Peter Parker (unaware Spider-Man’s about to face one of the greatest battles of his life) which serves as a reminder about how much he has changed, and how much things have remained the same.
    Ultimate Spider-Man #65
    The epilogue to the Carnage story revealed a potential for the Ultimate Flash to be a better man, and represented one of the few recent good scenes with his buddy Kong.

    If you guys want to agree/ disagree/ suggest more recommended reading/ showcase your own lists, I'd love to see it. I'll probably update this on a daily or so basis.
    Last edited by Mister Mets; 10-12-2007 at 09:55 AM.

  2. #2
    Moderator Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    23,020

    Default

    14. Sandman

    First Appearance: Amazing Spider-Man #4
    Creators: Stan Lee/ Steve Ditko
    Sandman has one of the best superpowers of any villain in comic books, not just the Spider-Man books, so it's no surprise that the villain was used for the third Spider-man film. His slow redemption, going so far as to join the Avengers for a limited time just made him more compelling as a character. His return to villainy was one of the highlights (there weren't many) of the Post-Reboot/ Pre- Jenkins/ JMS era. He's a character who had been underutilized recently, even when Spider-Man 3 came out.

    Recommended Reading
    Amazing Spider-Man #4/ Annual 1/ 18-19
    These stories featured Sandman as a visually compelling villain, who used his abilities in creative ways. Each issue had some fantastic moments, especially the 10 panel non-fight which led to Spider-Man being declared a coward.
    Fantastic Four #61-63
    Sandman disappeared from the Spider-Man books for about a hundred issues, but worked just as well as a Fantastic Four villain. This Lee/ Kirby three-parter begins with the former Frightful Four member taking on the Fantastic Four by himself, and nearly killing Reed Richards. Things only get worse when Sandman sides with new villain Blastaar.
    Webspinners #7-9
    This untold storyline features Sandman trying to raise his profile as a supervillain, and getting mutated into a freak, when Spider-Man decides to take the easy way out.
    Amazing Spider-Man #334-339
    Probably the best storyline with Sandman as hero. He's blackmailed into joining the Sinister Six, and participating in one of Doctor Octopus's more twisted plans.
    Spider-Man #18-23
    A sequel to "Return of the Sinister Six" this storyline features Sandman trying to gain revenge against Doctor Octopus after the above storyline. The highlight for the character is what he does after he's transformed into glass, and shattered.
    Spider-Man 3
    It was a flawed movie, but Thomas Hayden Church's performance as Sandman was excellent (and he was a great choice for the role), and the special effects were astounding (and revolutionary.)

    Aside- A Spider-Man VS Sinister Six oversized collection with the above two storylines would kick ass. Or they could both be part of an Erik Larsen omnibus to follow a Todd Mcfarlane omnibus.
    Last edited by Mister Mets; 10-12-2007 at 09:57 AM.

  3. #3
    RADI☼ACTIVE nuclearman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,060

    Default

    Interesting start Cyberman... I don't think I'd have either of them in my top 15.. good characters nonetheless...

    I look forward to the rest.

  4. #4
    misanthrope brundlefly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    nashville
    Posts
    4,498

    Default

    Definitely agree with Flash. Not necessarily with Sandman, personally, but you gave some good rationale for his inclusion. Plus, if everyone's Top 10 or 20 lists were exactly the same, then they wouldn't be very interesting.

    Looking forward to checking out the remaining 13.
    Progress isn't made by early risers. It's made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something. - Robert Heinlen

  5. #5
    Moderator Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    23,020

    Default

    13. Harry Osborn/ Green Goblin 2

    First Appearance: As Harry Osborn (Amazing Spider-Man #31)
    As Green Goblin 2 (Amazing Spider-Man #136)
    Creators: Lee/ Ditko
    Soon after he first appeared, rich jerk Harry Osborn filled a void in Peter’s supporting cast, slowly becoming his best friend. But he had his flaws, developing an addiction to LSD. Then his father died, and he learned of his father’s legacy as the Green Goblin, deciding to become the villain himself. During his outings as the Green Goblin he was never as competent as his father, or the Hobgoblin, but that made him more compelling as a character. He gained stability becoming a husband and father, but his own father’s legacy was too much for him, and he became the Green Goblin one last time. He's been dead for more than a decade, and I honestly wouldn't mind a future writer with a plan bringing him back.

    Recommended Reading
    Amazing Spider-Man #39-40
    Harry became a more sympathetic character in this storyline which established his twisted relationship with his father, who turned out to be Spider-man’s most dangerous enemy, ensuring Harry’s continued role in the series, and a tension between Peter and Harry as Peter realizes he can’t fight the Green Goblin without hurting his best friend’s dad.
    Spider-Man: Blue
    This mini series perfectly charts the progress of Peter’s friendship with Harry Osborn, as they become room mates, and Harry goes on to date Mary Jane.
    Amazing Spider-Man #96-98
    This storyline is notable for Harry’s overdose, and the end of his relationship with Mary Jane Watson. While I think it’s a tad overrated as a Spider-Man story, it is one of Harry’s best, and truly shows Peter’s love for his friend.
    Amazing Spider-Man #121-122
    Memorable for Harry’s second relapse, his intense guilt when he realizes the effect it has on his father, Peter Parker choosing between revenge and helping his best friend, and the set-up to Harry Osborn becoming the Green Goblin.
    Amazing Spider-Man #136-137
    Gerry Conway concludes plot threads he had been setting up for over an year, as the father becomes the son, and Peter Parker’s loved ones are put in danger.
    Amazing Spider-Man #176-180
    This concluded Len Wein’s run on Spider-Man, and his redemption of Harry Osborn, as the Green Goblin returned, but not in the way you'd expect.
    Amazing Spider-Man #312
    This storyline’s notable for a saner Harry Osborn being forced to use his father’s weapons against a crazed Hobgoblin. And it’s got Todd Mcfarlane drawing the Green Goblin, and Hobgoblin.
    Spectacular Spider-Man #178-189, 199-200
    I don’t understand why there isn’t a two volume series ‘Spectacular Spider-Man Visionaries: JM Dematteis” to collect this arc (or an Omnibus volume. That would be awesome.)
    Anyway, JM Dematteis effectively turned Harry Osborn into a "big bad" for Spider-Man, a mastermind whose presence haunted issues he didn't appear in. It was one of the greatest challenges of Spider-Man's life, as even imprisoning his pal wasn't going to work. It all concluded in a tragic final encounter between the two best friends.
    Spider-Man the Movie/ Spider-Man 2/ Spider-Man 3
    Peter Parker’s friendship with Harry became an important part of these films, establishing a trilogy with a clear beginning, middle and end. The first featured Harry as a complex slightly spoiled kid who watched as his best friend stole the affections of his father, and his girl. The second featured Harry making good on his vow to avenge his father, and perfectly established him as a potential threat to Spider-Man. The third reminded viewers just how lonely he was, while showing him at his worst and eventually his best (in the final battle sequence). And there were some beautiful special effects in the fight sequences.
    Last edited by Mister Mets; 10-12-2007 at 10:00 AM.

  6. #6
    I get up plenty soon! Keehar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,468

    Default

    I didn't think Harry would be that low in the list.

    Looking forward to seeing the rest.

  7. #7
    Son of Satan Hellstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    648

    Default

    Rocket Racer is so number 2. ;)
    Pull List: DC: Aquaman, Batman, Constantine, Justice League Dark, Red Hood and the Outlaws, Green Arrow Marvel: Hawkeye, Uncanny X-Men, Venom, Young Avengers IDW: Crow

  8. #8
    I get up plenty soon! Keehar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hellstormer View Post
    Rocket Racer is so number 2. ;)
    Hell no.

    The Walrus is getting that.

  9. #9
    Moderator Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    23,020

    Default

    12. Kraven the Hunter


    First Appearance: Amazing Spider-Man #15
    Creators: Stan Lee/ Steve Ditko
    Given the animal-based abilities of Spider-man and his enemies, the idea of a hunter targeting him was a pretty good one. In the first fifty issues of Spider-Man, Kraven was an effective menace, a guy who just wanted to kill Spider-Man for no other reason than the bragging rights of having killed him. He then fell out of favor, until the six-part saga in which he beat, and buried Spider-Man. His legacy continues to haunt Spider-Man through his sons, his girlfriend Calypso, and through his crazed half-brother Chameleon. He'll probably appear in a future Spider-Man movie when the writers realize they if they can adapt Kraven's Last Hunt substituting the Lizard for Vermin, most of their job will be done for them.

    Recommended Reading
    Spectacular Spider-Man Annual 1996

    An excellent retelling of Amazing Spider-Man #15 by JM Dematteis, this storyline explored how scary it was for Spider-Man to be poisoned, and foreshadowed the Kraven of the Final Symmetry storyline, while exploring Kraven's relationship to Chameleon in a darker way.
    Amazing Spider-Man #34
    The plot with Kraven impersonating Spider-Man foreshadows Kraven's Last Hunt, but really this is just a fun romp.
    Amazing Spider-Man #47/ 49
    Just another fun Kraven story, as the villain targets Peter Parker's friends, and later gets into an ill-advised team-up with the second Vulture.
    Amazing Spider-Man Annual 1996: Heart and Soul
    Excellent under-rated untold tale by Defalco & Frenz, notable for featuring Kraven trying to make good on his previous threats, and the scene in which George Stacy learns Spider-Man's ID.
    Kraven’s Last Hunt
    This may just be the best story for any of Spider-Man’s enemies. JM Dematteis resurrects the potential of this villain with a storyline in which he deals with his fears, and weaknesses, and wins. His age/ connection to Russia have become defining aspects of the character. I’ve heard the criticism that this story focused too much on Kraven to be a great Spider-Man story (which wouldn’t be valid if the four issues in which Spider-Man did appear weren’t so damn good.)
    Spectacular Spider-Man #241-246
    Not really a Kraven stor, but it dealt effectively with Chameleon's true relationship to Kraven (and opinion of the man), and did a good job of introducing Kraven's second son. This story insured that every Chameleon tale afterwards would reference Kraven.

    Future Spider-Man Film
    C'mon Marvel/ Sony, please? Just imagine Gerard Butler as a guy without any real super-powers who could still kick Spider-Man's ass.
    Last edited by Mister Mets; 10-12-2007 at 10:06 AM.

  10. #10
    Moderator Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    23,020

    Default

    11. Roderick Kingsley/ The Hobgoblin

    First Appearance: Peter Parker the Spectacular Spider-Man #43 (as Roderick Kingsley)
    Amazing Spider-Man #238 (as Hobgoblin)
    Creators: Roger Stern, John Romita Jr, John Romita Sr, Mike Zeck
    Writer Roger Stern decided to replicate the thrill of the original Green Goblin mystery, and surpassed those issues with his introduction of the Hobgoblin, a villain who became notable for his brutal efficiency (and the quality of those first stories.) It’s a damn shame that the Hobgoblin, almost universally acknowledged as one of the great spider-Man villains hasn’t been used in the regular comic books for almost a decade, although the primary reason for that could be that the post-resurrection Norman Osborn has essentially usurped as the calm sometimes behind the scenes master villain (a deviation from the pre-resurrection Green Goblin.)

    Recommended Reading
    Amazing Spider-Man 238-251

    This arc begins with the origin of the Hobgoblin, a villain who lacked Norman Osborn’s insanity, but more than made up for it in ruthlessness. Each appearance showed the villain becoming more and more experienced, and he became an effective “big bad” impacting stories he didn’t appear in, as when Spider-Man’s search for the Hobgoblin leads him to other villains.
    An excellent summary of the era is available at...
    http://www.spideykicksbutt.com/Top10...eystories.html
    Spider-Man: The Hobgoblin Lives #1-3
    The Hobgoblin returns, his identity is finally revealed, that Jason Macendale shmuck dies, and Ned Leeds goes down in history as one of Peter Parker's murdered friends, and not as a master villain It’s a tragedy that he hasn’t been used much afterwards.

    That's sadly it. The Hobgoblin's really underutilized in the current comics. I really hope to see more of the character in the future. The idea of Dan Slott & John Romita Jr writing an arc with the character is very appealing.
    Last edited by Mister Mets; 10-12-2007 at 10:09 AM.

  11. #11
    Moderator Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    23,020

    Default

    10. The Alien Costume/ Venom




    First Appearance:
    (Alien Costume) Amazing Spider-Man #252/ Secret Wars #8
    (Venom) Amazing Spider-Man #299
    (Mac Gargan) Amazing Spider-Man #19
    (Perfect Venom) Marvel Knights Spider-Man #10
    Creators:
    (Mac Gargan) Lee/ Ditko
    (Alien Costume) Jim Shooter
    (Venom) David Micheline/ Todd Mcfarlane
    (Perfect Venom) Mark Millar/ Terry Dodson

    Venom isn't the first, or the best villain with the powers and abilities of the hero (Bizarro, Abomination, and Professor Zoom come to mind.) However, there's still a lot to like about the character. First there's the way Peter Parker brought the alien costume to Earth, making him somewhat responsible for everyone Venom (and Carnage) have killed. Eddie Brock's sheer hatred of Spider-Man and desire to just kill him made him a pretty scary foe (even if his motivations were a bit off) along with his knowledge of Spider-Man's secret identity. However, I think he's become an even more effective villain when the costume went into the hands of Mac Gargan, who was already one of Spider-Man's greatest enemies. The "Perfect Venom" has tremendous potential, and has already proven himself to be one of the scariest Spider-Man foes. Pity that so few writers have used the idea after Millar's run.

    And I shouldn't neglect how cool the very idea of the alien costume: a costume that gives the hero more powers/ corrupts him is.
    Last edited by Mister Mets; 10-12-2007 at 10:14 AM.

  12. #12
    Moderator Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    23,020

    Default

    Recommended Reading-Alien Costume

    Amazing Spider-Man #252-259: The original alien costume saga. Still the highlight of Defalco's Spider-Man career.
    Web of Spider-Man #1: The alien costume VS Spider-Man. Includes the cool moment with the alien costume impersonating a Spider-Man suit.
    Ultimate Spider-Man #35: The alien costume saga supercompressed into one issue. The highlight of the issue (and the Ultimate Venom saga) is Spider-Man’s transformation when he gets pissed.
    The Spider-Man 3 The movie could've been better at featuring how the Alien costume made Spider-Man stronger and more vicious, but I still recommend it.
    Spidergirl #5: Still my favorite Spidergirl tale, as the symbiote escapes and takes over Peter Parker once more. I'm surprised it was done as a single issue.

    Recommended Reading: Venom
    Amazing Spider-Man #300
    The first, and best Eddie Brock Venom story, and one of the strongest introductions to any Spider-Man villain.
    Amazing Spider-Man #315-317
    Micheline/ Macfarlane's follow-up. I love Eddie Brock paying a visit to Peter's home, and their brutal fights. Plus, he had great ways of escaping prison.
    Spectacular Spider-Man #1-5
    This was an under-rated story, especially the final issue, with new revelations about Venom, and Eddie Brock, as the Alien Costume began developing a mind of its own. It left Spider-Man in the difficult position of reuniting Brock and Venom, or allowing Eddie Brock to die.
    Ultimate Spider-man the Video Game
    Venom’s role in this game is greater than his role in the Ultimate comics, but his levels are so much fun to play. Plus, he's a helluva boss, especially that last fight with him.
    Marvel Knights Spider-Man #5-12
    Eddie Brock gives up the costume, and it gets into the hands of one of Spider-man's greatest foes. So good it was worth the crap that resulted from the overexposure of the character in the 90s.
    Spider-Man 3: Topher Grace played Eddie Brock perfectly as the Anti-Peter Parker (an interesting interpretation) and the final battle was awesome. The biggest complaint was that Venom's role was too small, and might have been better split over two movies (with the first half showing the Alien Costume saga, and the second half featuring Venom.)
    Last edited by Mister Mets; 10-12-2007 at 10:17 AM.

  13. #13
    *blink* Chris N's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    might come rambling to your town
    Posts
    17,230

    Default

    Great list so far! Except maybe for Harry being a little low for my tastes... but I'll offer my unwanted 2 cents when it's all done.

    We should be placing bets.

    I've got Big Wheel at #7. Anyone wanna take over/under? What odds will you give me?
    formerly coke & comics

    Sleepwalker is Sandman done right. ~Tadhg

  14. #14
    Moderator Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    23,020

    Default

    If you guys thought that Harry was too low on the list.... :evilsmile
    9. Mary Jane Watson (Parker)


    First Full Appearance: Amazing Spider-Man #42 (Cameo appearance in Amazing Spider-Man #25)
    Creators: Stan Lee/ John Romita Sr

    For several years she was a mystery woman Aunt May kept trying to set Peter up with. Then came perhaps the best introduction of any character in any comic book, as we met a party girl who dominated (in a good way) most scenes she was in, and made Gwen Stacy forgettable in comparison. Meanwhile she became the most unknowable character in the series, as Stan Lee only featured a single thought balloon for her in his entire run of Spider-Man. It made her compelling, and mysterious, and made you question the party girl facade. She was an indelible part of the supporting cast, and went on to become Spider-Man's loving wife, and a fixture of the Marvel Universe, with her own monthly book!

    I'm probably going to be asked why I ranked her so low, so here goes...
    1. I think the other 8 characters are more compelling on their own merits.
    2. Mary Jane has remained a remarkably inconsistent character in her development from romantic complication to the love of Peter's life. The Mary Jane who's established as the future love of Peter's life (and the one in the Ultimate/ movie universes) are different characters than the one Lee created. I just don't see the 616 Spider-Man getting nicknamed "Brainy Jane."
    3. Many of the elements which were used to establish Mary Jane as the true love of Peter's life smack of artificiality. There's the retcon that she always knew who Spider-Man was, which while unique, was contrary to many of her earlier scenes. It could have been developed a lot better, and has been notably ignored in recent Untold Tales (such as Spider-Man: Blue.) Then there's the out-of-nowhere idea that Peter's always been in love with MJ, which didn't originate with the movies, and while cute, just doesn't ring as true in relation to the earlier tales. Their wedding was also rushed, and I think she's been portrayed as more of a plot device than a character, as writers often don't know what to do with her.
    Last edited by Mister Mets; 10-12-2007 at 10:19 AM.

  15. #15
    Moderator Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    23,020

    Default

    Recommended Reading:
    Untold Tales of Spider-Man #16: "Who's that Girl?" Spider-Man from the POV of a girl who knows who Spider-Man is, but doesn't know Peter Parker. A highlight of Busiek's Untold Tales.
    Amazing Spider-Man #42: For perhaps the best introduction in Marvel history.
    Spider-Man Blue:Adapts some great Spider-Man stories, with a focus on the Gwen/Peter/MJ love triangle, and it does it perfectly.
    Amazing Spider-Man #121-122: For the choice Mary Jane has to make at the end.
    Amazing Spider-Man #141-149: This storyline showed the development of Peter, and Mary Jane's relationship in the aftermath of Gwen's death, along with the first great complication, as Gwen Stacy seemingly returns from the dead.
    Amazing Spider-Man #242-243: Roger Stern brings the character back after an extended absence to further complicate Peter's love life.
    Spider-Man VS Wolverine:This was a great example from the period where Mary Jane was Peter's confidante, and nothing more. It explored their relationship as Peter was left essentially shell-shocked after several tragedies.
    Kraven's Last Hunt: Compelling look at what it's like to Spider-Man's wife. Several weeks in their relationship her husband goes missing, someone else is wearing the costume, and Mary Jane doesn't know where to turn.
    Amazing Spider-Man #365: John Romita Sr recalls his romance comic skills writing an untold tale of Mary Jane, and Gwen.
    Spectacular Spider-Man #200: The conclusion of one of Spider-Man's greatest challenges. And it his wife who saves the day, overcoming her worse nightmare, and recognizing the good in a former friend.
    Spectacular Spider-Man #241-245: The highlight of JM Dematteis's second run on Spectacular Spider-Man may just be his portrayal of Mary Jane in this five part storyline, as a woman dealing with the aftermath of a tragedy, and still demonstrating an unwillingness to go along with a villain's plan. The scene with Spider-Man swinging with Mary Jane is one of the most romantic in the series.
    Marvel Knights Spider-Man #1-12: This may be the definitive Mary Jane as Peter's wife comic. Great scenes include Peter sending her away when a new villain learns his identity, realizing her jealousy with the Black Cat, unpaid credit card bills leading to money problems (a great example of the Parker luck), and Mary Jane vowing not to end up like Gwen.
    Web of Romance: Beautiful romantic one-shot by Beland, as Spider-Man gets the perfect Valentine's Day present for his wife.
    Sensational Spider-Man Annual One: Excellent look at Peter & MJ's relationship in the aftermath of Civil War, and their loyalty to one another.

    Ultimate Spider-Man: Bendis makes the brilliant move of redoing Spider-Man as the best damn teen soap opera there is, with each development in the relationship seeming real, as Peter and Mary
    Jane deal with break-ups, threats to her safety, divorcing parents, and some real tragedies.
    Spider-Man/ Spider-Man 2/ Spider-Man 3: The decision to make these movies more about Peter, and Mary Jane than Spider-Man has made the studios a lot of money, and led to some truly memorable scenes.
    Last edited by Mister Mets; 10-12-2007 at 10:25 AM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •