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View Full Version : What factors do you feel led to the X-Men becoming Marvel's #2 property?



[]D[]/\/\[]D @ Nite/So-tite
09-21-2011, 09:00 AM
The X-Men has been not only Marvel's #1 team franchise, but also it's #2 property right behind Spider-Man.

Yes, there's been cartoons, movies and games, but the X-Men managed to do this before it recieved a single cartoon, much less movies and other mainstream media exposure (except minus maybe computer games). That means it wasn't outside media exposure that led to the X-Men ranking near the top. The X-Men managed to reach that status based solely on the ability of the comics. Though he was popular, even Spider-Man didn't become Marvel's flagship property until the 60's cartoon.

So what are the factors that you feel led to the comics pushing the franchise up to the status of the publisher's #2 property, something even some of the most popular comic franchises (especially within Marvel and DC) are incapable of doing?

Jumpoff!
09-21-2011, 09:06 AM
They got relaunched,kept the same writer for a long time and he was able build those characters up. Plus for some reason people identify with them.

Nevets F
09-21-2011, 09:34 AM
The main factor:

Joe Quesada.

Valeria Kementari
09-21-2011, 09:46 AM
D[]/\/\[]D @ Nite/So-tite;13848837']The X-Men has been not only Marvel's #1 team franchise, but also it's #2 property right behind Spider-Man.

Yes, there's been cartoons, movies and games, but the X-Men managed to do this before it recieved a single cartoon, much less movies and other mainstream media exposure (except minus maybe computer games). That means it wasn't outside media exposure that led to the X-Men ranking near the top. The X-Men managed to reach that status based solely on the ability of the comics. Though he was popular, even Spider-Man didn't become Marvel's flagship property until the 60's cartoon.

So what are the factors that you feel led to the comics pushing the franchise up to the status of the publisher's #2 property, something even some of the most popular comic franchises (especially within Marvel and DC) are incapable of doing?

A status they recently lost to the Avengers... but back in the day it is true, it was merely through the strenght of the comic books. And there is just two words that x-plain it. Chris Claremont. He wrote stories that kept pushing the edge. He made women the protagonists (the nerve!). He created compelling storylines that were beyond the simple "we're goody two shoes that follow a very strict unwavering path". He had a diverse cast of heroes and gave each of them their own voice and equal spotlight. He wasn't afraid of tearing them down continuously only to bring them back up again. He introduced new characters and turned the old characters into relatable people. In short, he made a great fricking book.

Seresecros
09-21-2011, 09:59 AM
So you're asking how did it ascend to this position, not how it may or may not have fallen in "importance" recently. TAKE NOTE OF THAT BEFORE YOU START COMPLAINING, CBR.

just-my-2cents
09-21-2011, 10:06 AM
They got relaunched,kept the same writer for a long time and he was able build those characters up. Plus for some reason people identify with them.
This!!


A status they recently lost to the Avengers... but back in the day it is true, it was merely through the strenght of the comic books. And there is just two words that x-plain it. Chris Claremont. He wrote stories that kept pushing the edge. He made women the protagonists (the nerve!). He created compelling storylines that were beyond the simple "we're goody two shoes that follow a very strict unwavering path". He had a diverse cast of heroes and gave each of them their own voice and equal spotlight. He wasn't afraid of tearing them down continuously only to bring them back up again. He introduced new characters and turned the old characters into relatable people. In short, he made a great fricking book.

And this.... Exactly this close thread.

Sabrewulf
09-21-2011, 10:19 AM
Bad editors, poor choice of talent. Pretty much whatever they could do wrong they did and for the most part still are doing.

Valeria Kementari
09-21-2011, 10:31 AM
So you're asking how did it ascend to this position, not how it may or may not have fallen in "importance" recently. TAKE NOTE OF THAT BEFORE YOU START COMPLAINING, CBR.

lol I love how several posters already show they don't even read the OP and think that this thread is exactly about the fall from grace instead of the rise to success. Bravo for a misleading title Nite so tite. Bravo.

Seresecros
09-21-2011, 10:43 AM
lol I love how several posters already show they don't even read the OP and think that this thread is exactly about the fall from grace instead of the rise to success. Bravo for a misleading title Nite so tite. Bravo.

They're so keen to complain about everything that they do it as a reflex. How sad.

Valeria Kementari
09-21-2011, 10:50 AM
They're so keen to complain about everything that they do it as a reflex. How sad.

the mods should take notice and start banning. Roguishgurl we beseech you: do your job!!

[]D[]/\/\[]D @ Nite/So-tite
09-21-2011, 12:36 PM
They got relaunched,kept the same writer for a long time and he was able build those characters up. Plus for some reason people identify with them.

The thing is that a majority of long-running, single-writer books still never managed to reach that level of popularity.

Not even works like Sandman.

Shaun of Candlekeep
09-21-2011, 01:18 PM
Making characterisation their first priority and action their second was a notable part of it IMO. Also they got alot of joy out of the whole metaphor for minorities thing, and their message of tolerance and inclusion. Storm being an obvious one, along with Kitty and, yes, Colossus - the Cold War was still a factor back then after all.