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Eumenides
12-11-2009, 05:22 AM
Are you read for The World That's Coming?

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll252/Aleph99/Cover1.jpg

Well, are you?

I sure wasn't. This series was amazing. I read the 8 issues a few days ago and can't stop thinking about them. Each issue was full of insane ideas and all-out action.

This is the unstoppable OMAC leaving a factory he destroyed single-handedly:

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll252/Aleph99/OMAC.jpg

And here we can see the creepy, faceless agents of the Global Peace Agency:

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll252/Aleph99/GPAAgents.jpg

But they're not as creepy as Brother Eye, the gigantic, secret satellite watching over us:

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll252/Aleph99/BrotherEye.jpg

OMAC was a lovely mix of superhero, science fiction and TV shows like The Man From U.N.C.L.E. that allowed Kirby's imagination to run wild. It's a pity we only have 8 issues to enjoy.

Roquefort Raider
12-11-2009, 05:42 AM
I loved Omac. It had all the powerful simplicity of a 1970s Kirby comic.

edhopper
12-11-2009, 06:33 AM
I really liked Kirby's post Fourth World DC books. I just found Kamadi and The Demon (OMAC as well) much more enjoyable than the New Gods. Not that those weren't good books, I just liked his later series more.

scratchie
12-11-2009, 07:48 AM
Classic 70s Kirby. I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for this one because it was the first Kirby-written work I ever saw, when a friend of mine turned me on to it, circa 1976 or 77.

Crazy and all-over-the-place, like most of his work, but this is (I think) as good a starting point as any to experience his 70s work, since it's self-contained and not too long.

Also, irrespective of historical importance(?), there are several bursts of pure brilliance in this series, starting with the tagline "The World That's Coming" (i.e. not "The World of the Future", but the world of the very-very-near future), and including the issue (#2?) where a rich guy buys an entire city to throw a party. I wouldn't be at all surprised if we see that sort of behavior in real life before the end of the next decade, unless our economy tanks completely.

Dan Felty
12-11-2009, 07:58 AM
I just had my first exposure to OMAC a couple months ago. It definitely seemed like Kirby without a filter!

Jim Starlin did a three-part OMAC series in the eighties. It was fair to middling.

Paul Pope did an awesome (awesome!) OMAC story in his issue of Solo that's really worth tracking down. I read it and kept thinking, 'wow, those are some really odd choices he's making.' I later discovered that it was basically a note-for-note reproduction of Kirby's OMAC #1!

Eumenides
12-12-2009, 05:36 AM
Crazy and all-over-the-place, like most of his work, but this is (I think) as good a starting point as any to experience his 70s work, since it's self-contained and not too long.

Sadly, none of his '70s series can be accused of being too long; they all died too soon :frown:

I also like the fact that it's a self-contained story. In fact, I applaud Kirby's attempt at starting several new series that were practically detached from the DCU. Apart from the Fourth World Saga, which had Jimmy Olsen and Superman, it was all brand-new concepts in original universes: Kamandi, OMAC, The Demon. Which only makes me sad to see them all being dragged into the DCU continuity. In a way, Kirby was the percursor of the Vertigo, self-contained, finite series.

JKCarrier
12-12-2009, 07:29 AM
including the issue (#2?) where a rich guy buys an entire city to throw a party. I wouldn't be at all surprised if we see that sort of behavior in real life before the end of the next decade, unless our economy tanks completely.

Not exactly the same thing, but didn't Kim Basinger outright buy a small town back in the '80s?

A lot of OMAC is remarkably prescient: Virtual reality games, "Real Dolls", black market human organs, corporations so big and powerful they become de facto nations. Just the other day, I saw a tv commercial that joked about going online and finding a "virtual mom", which reminded me of the old couple who get hired to be OMAC's surrogate parents.

One of my favorite bits is the special areas set aside in the office where workers can go to have a good cry, or beat up effigies of their bosses. I could've used that in some of my previous jobs. :wink:

berk
12-12-2009, 11:10 AM
Sadly, none of his '70s series can be accused of being too long; they all died too soon :frown:

I also like the fact that it's a self-contained story. In fact, I applaud Kirby's attempt at starting several new series that were practically detached from the DCU. Apart from the Fourth World Saga, which had Jimmy Olsen and Superman, it was all brand-new concepts in original universes: Kamandi, OMAC, The Demon. Which only makes me sad to see them all being dragged into the DCU continuity. In a way, Kirby was the percursor of the Vertigo, self-contained, finite series.It's maddening. It drives me crazy whenever I see someone from Marvel or DC spouting praise for Kirby's genius and legacy and then see the very same people proceed to write stories that shit all over everything Kirby was trying to do. All in service to the very same kind of editors and bean-counting management who worked against Kirby and undermined his work back in the day at those same companies. And to name names, I'm thinking most recently of Neil Gaiman and Grant Morrison, who both know better. The whole spectacle makes me physically ill.

Eumenides
12-12-2009, 06:34 PM
One of my favorite bits is the special areas set aside in the office where workers can go to have a good cry, or beat up effigies of their bosses. I could've used that in some of my previous jobs. :wink:

I thought that idea pretty creepy, because Buddy Blank remarks how the dummies are 'lifelike'; so in effect the workers are blowing steam by fantasising they're killing people :eek:

Jezebel Bond
12-12-2009, 07:56 PM
Had to look this up on Mile High Comics because although I've heard of the character, I've never actually read the book. (Same goes for Kamandi). Noticed it ran for 8 issues, was a deliberate mini series or did bad circulation cut it short?

I think my favourite below-12 issues bronze DC run is The Joker...

Aaron King
12-12-2009, 09:13 PM
It was canceled. I believe Kirby changed the last panel of the final issue, though, to bring the series to a sort-of-conclusion.

Eumenides
12-13-2009, 04:06 AM
It was canceled. I believe Kirby changed the last panel of the final issue, though, to bring the series to a sort-of-conclusion.

In the last issue, Doctor Skuba has reverted OMAC back to Buddy Blank, trapped inside the mad scientist's hideout. The villain also discovers the existence of Brother Eye and engages the satellite in battle. Apparently he manages to disable Brother Eye, but at the cost of killing himself. The series ends without addressing what will happen to Buddy Blank, since he was trapped inside Doctor Skuba's hideout when it exploded.

#8 was one of the most thrilling and action-packed comics I've ever read, and I've read a lot of comics; it was more exciting than many action movies out there. Throughout the series there was an increase of power in the villains, and Kirby left the best one for last: Doctor Skuba could 'manipulate atoms' so he can hurl meteors against Brother Eye in outer space; a human genius against an electronic brain, exchanging blows across space, it was epic and insane!

J'onn J'onzz
12-13-2009, 08:13 AM
I bought this whole series recently and I've read the first two issues so far. It's pretty bizarre, Kirby sure has had some weird concepts.

Sadly, none of his '70s series can be accused of being too long; they all died too soon :frown:

I also like the fact that it's a self-contained story. In fact, I applaud Kirby's attempt at starting several new series that were practically detached from the DCU. Apart from the Fourth World Saga, which had Jimmy Olsen and Superman, it was all brand-new concepts in original universes: Kamandi, OMAC, The Demon. Which only makes me sad to see them all being dragged into the DCU continuity. In a way, Kirby was the percursor of the Vertigo, self-contained, finite series.
Kamandi lasted five years (the last issue, #59, even had an OMAC story by Jim Starlin), even if Kirby was only around for about three of them.

David Elliott
12-13-2009, 08:29 AM
I bought this whole series recently and I've read the first two issues so far. It's pretty bizarre, Kirby sure has had some weird concepts.

Kamandi lasted five years (the last issue, #59, even had an OMAC story by Jim Starlin), even if Kirby was only around for about three of them.

But what a glorious 3 years! More ideas in a single issue than most books in a series.

Also really loved his underrated LOSERS run. Jack Kirby's time at DC during the 70's produced all my favorite "desert island" comics. Still wishing DC would print a complete "DAYS OF THE MOB" collection of issues 1 and the never printed issue 2. A big BLACK MAGIC collection would go down a treat as well, they could include his SPIRIT WORLD material.

md62
12-13-2009, 10:28 AM
I loved Kirby's DC work. From his Challengers of the Unknown in the late 50's to his 70's stuff. Kamandi & Mr Miracle were my favorites.

earl
12-13-2009, 05:30 PM
I read John Byrne's take on OMAC for the first time about six months or so. I thought it was pretty good, very dark for him. It really brought out the creepy nature of the comic and he did seem to try and make it fit in with what Kirby had done. I might be in the minority, but I thought it was pretty good.

Eumenides
12-14-2009, 06:22 PM
It's maddening. It drives me crazy whenever I see someone from Marvel or DC spouting praise for Kirby's genius and legacy and then see the very same people proceed to write stories that shit all over everything Kirby was trying to do. All in service to the very same kind of editors and bean-counting management who worked against Kirby and undermined his work back in the day at those same companies. And to name names, I'm thinking most recently of Neil Gaiman and Grant Morrison, who both know better. The whole spectacle makes me physically ill.

Sadly many still confuse love for creators with love for continuity. For comics fans, which is what most creators today are, something is not good or worthy until it joins the glorious universe of shared continuity. You can see the process happening today in the MU, with two fine characters - Sentry, Marvel Boy - being stripped of their originality to conform with continuity.

I'm sure Kirby's fans really think they're doing him a favor by putting him in continuity, because the greatest thing that can happen to a character is to share a story with Superman :redface:

hondobrode
12-14-2009, 06:50 PM
OMAC and Kamandi were both crazy good.

Love the character of the Demon but that rhyming drives me crazy ! It's painful to read.

Fourth World is cool but doesn't really come together like it should of due to cancellation and Kirby not getting enough space to fully develolp the momentum and and interconnected rhythm they needed

scratchie
12-15-2009, 01:40 PM
I read John Byrne's take on OMAC for the first time about six months or so. I thought it was pretty good, very dark for him. It really brought out the creepy nature of the comic and he did seem to try and make it fit in with what Kirby had done.I have to respectfully disagree. By taking it out of "The World That's Coming" and putting it into an "alternate timeline", I thought Byrne significantly reduced the level of creepiness in the comic.

Plus, the whole time travel "twist" was kind of weak, I thought, more like something written on a dare than an actual story ("I bet I can write a time travel story where the twist is, you have to XXXX XXXX XXXX").

And finally, I thought his use of zip-a-tone (or whatever they were) screens for greyscale was amateurish and clumsy. He kept putting different grey "tones" next to each other in ways that looked really awful. Next time, hire Terry Austin!

But I did enjoy the series somewhat, and the graphic design of the volumes is gorgeous. Maybe I should give that one another shot.