PDA

View Full Version : Shot through the head and dumped in a river



dancj
08-14-2008, 05:30 AM
Steven - I don't know if you've read Dennis O'Neil's The Question, because


That scenario you described of someone being shot in the head and dumped in a river, only to wake up and find the bulled passed around the outside of the skull and came out the other side is exactly what happened to The Question in the first issue.

I thought you might be interested. What I don't get is why after travelling around the outside of your skull the bullet would turn to escape out the other side.

Paradox
08-14-2008, 07:00 AM
I knew a person personally that had that happen, and, yes, the exit wound was almost exactly opposite the entry. Not that I know WHY, but it does happen.

BTW, in this case he shot himself.

bartl
08-14-2008, 07:51 AM
Just a footnote: 22's are a preferred weapon of assassins because they can be made small, are easily silenced, and, when used with a high level of skill (I don't want to use the word, "properly" in this context), are unlikely to cause "collateral damage", or, more importantly, attract "collateral attention".

If you want to defend yourself, ask pretty much any police officer or person who has actively served in the military: virtually all of them will recommend a shotgun. Doesn't need to be carefully aimed, lots of stopping power, can be used against a gang or mob, and, notably in the case of a pump shotgun, the act of cocking it is usually sufficient to cause the opponent to break off the attack and flee (the best kind of defensive weapon is the one you never have to use).

Imaginos666
08-14-2008, 08:07 AM
Another note about the unrealized dangers of .22 caliber bullets: they have a high tendency to ricochet inside the body. If a .22 strikes you in the chest, there is a possibility it will ricochet inside you and do a lot of damage that can't be repaired. Imagine a bullet bouncing around your ribcage ... even one bounce is enough do internal damage to several major organs.

My first job out of high school was selling guns (don't ask; it's not that interesting.) I made the mistake of comparing a .22 to a BB gun in front of some guys who had been at the game a lot longer than me, and they set me straight (and were none to polite about it.) An ER doctor later confirmed for me the unpredictable nature of a .22 bullet.

Buzz Dixon
08-14-2008, 08:49 AM
Several decades ago a NYC policeman was shot through the eye by a .22 fired from across the Hudson River. The bullet had enough force to penetrate the eye socket then ricocheted around the inside of the unfortunate man's skull. The autopsy describe the injury to his brain as being cored like an apple.

And, conversely, there are documented incidents of .22 lead slugs exploding when they hit a paper target. They are indeed highly unpredictable rounds.

Michael P
08-14-2008, 10:18 AM
Just a footnote: 22's are a preferred weapon of assassins because they can be made small, are easily silenced, and, when used with a high level of skill (I don't want to use the word, "properly" in this context), are unlikely to cause "collateral damage", or, more importantly, attract "collateral attention".

If you want to defend yourself, ask pretty much any police officer or person who has actively served in the military: virtually all of them will recommend a shotgun. Doesn't need to be carefully aimed, lots of stopping power, can be used against a gang or mob, and, notably in the case of a pump shotgun, the act of cocking it is usually sufficient to cause the opponent to break off the attack and flee (the best kind of defensive weapon is the one you never have to use).

Not very useful against zombies, though.

Steven Grant
08-14-2008, 12:22 PM
Steven - I don't know if you've read Dennis O'Neil's The Question, because

Nope, never read it because I've made it a point to never read anyone's Question but Steve Ditko's. Some characters I do that with.

Guess it's just as well I never did the bit then, eh?

As for why it does that, not sure. I doubt it's like the trajectory of an arrow through the head of anything like that...

- Grant

Steven Grant
08-14-2008, 12:31 PM
Just a footnote: 22's are a preferred weapon of assassins because they can be made small, are easily silenced, and, when used with a high level of skill (I don't want to use the word, "properly" in this context), are unlikely to cause "collateral damage", or, more importantly, attract "collateral attention".

If you want to defend yourself, ask pretty much any police officer or person who has actively served in the military: virtually all of them will recommend a shotgun. Doesn't need to be carefully aimed, lots of stopping power, can be used against a gang or mob, and, notably in the case of a pump shotgun, the act of cocking it is usually sufficient to cause the opponent to break off the attack and flee (the best kind of defensive weapon is the one you never have to use).

Like I said in the column, a .22 used at close enough range that hits the right place is fatal. Shoot someone through the eye at a slightly upwards angle and pointing slightly inside, and that person's very likely not walking away from it.

A shotgun is good for anything requiring any modicum of distance, but it has its hazards close range, especially when used anywhere that doesn't present direct line of sight and when used by someone inexperienced with a shotgun. (Even the experienced have to be very careful.) Because of the length of most shotguns, they're relatively easy to take away from you or deflect if you end up within barrel length of your target.

Actually, one of the best non-lethal weapons for moving in tight areas is a good watchman's flashlight, the kind with a long heavy handle. You hold it with an overhand grip at the back of the head and rest the handle on your shoulder. If someone jumps out at you, all you need to is flip your arm forward and down and the heavy handle becomes a very good club.

Of course, you still have to aim even that properly, so the best defense against any situation still is not to get into it...

- Grant

Brenz
08-14-2008, 12:35 PM
Not very useful against zombies, though.

Unless you shoot one in the eye from across the Hudson River.

Imaginos666
08-15-2008, 08:45 AM
Like I said in the column, a .22 used at close enough range that hits the right place is fatal. Shoot someone through the eye at a slightly upwards angle and pointing slightly inside, and that person's very likely not walking away from it.

A shotgun is good for anything requiring any modicum of distance, but it has its hazards close range, especially when used anywhere that doesn't present direct line of sight and when used by someone inexperienced with a shotgun. (Even the experienced have to be very careful.) Because of the length of most shotguns, they're relatively easy to take away from you or deflect if you end up within barrel length of your target.

Actually, one of the best non-lethal weapons for moving in tight areas is a good watchman's flashlight, the kind with a long heavy handle. You hold it with an overhand grip at the back of the head and rest the handle on your shoulder. If someone jumps out at you, all you need to is flip your arm forward and down and the heavy handle becomes a very good club.

Of course, you still have to aim even that properly, so the best defense against any situation still is not to get into it...

- Grant

Those flashlights were designed with that kind of use in mind. My father was in the military, and the years he worked security had to carry one of those flashlights. I asked him why it weighed 10 pounds (probably not that much, but it was a lot heavier and a lot larger than it needed to be) and he gave me the gory details.


About 10 years ago I covered the trial of a police officer charged with murder for the shooting death of an unarmed man. The suspect (who had stolen a car) was running away from him on foot when he was shot. The officer claimed he thought the man had a gun, but no weapon was found.

Anyhoo, the bullet hit the man in the bicep and passed through, and shouldn't have been a mortal wound. He kept running, though, and police later found his corpse behind the local rescue squad building ... where he had bled to death.

The cop was white, the suspect black. Anyone care to guess what the jury's verdict was?

Steven Grant
08-15-2008, 09:18 AM
Those flashlights were designed with that kind of use in mind. My father was in the military, and the years he worked security had to carry one of those flashlights. I asked him why it weighed 10 pounds (probably not that much, but it was a lot heavier and a lot larger than it needed to be) and he gave me the gory details.

I know. That's why they make good weapons. The ones most commonly commercially available aren't that heavy, maybe a pound and change with an array of D cell batteries in them, but they're good enough to hurt real good whereas your father's type was made to crush skulls.


About 10 years ago I covered the trial of a police officer charged with murder for the shooting death of an unarmed man. The suspect (who had stolen a car) was running away from him on foot when he was shot. The officer claimed he thought the man had a gun, but no weapon was found.

Anyhoo, the bullet hit the man in the bicep and passed through, and shouldn't have been a mortal wound. He kept running, though, and police later found his corpse behind the local rescue squad building ... where he had bled to death.

The cop was white, the suspect black. Anyone care to guess what the jury's verdict was?

I need more information, like was the trial in Simi Valley or South Central? I could assume in favor of the cop because he's white and a cop and juries tend to side with white cops; I could assume in favor of the victim, if the shooting took place in a city where there is a history, perceived or real, of cops shooting black men who turned out not to have had any weapons on them. Normally, though, juries and oversight boards swing in favor of police in cases of apparent but apparently provoked police misconduct.

Bullets are tricky and unpredictable. Even the smallest, lamest bullet can kill someone if it tears an artery or hits a vital organ. Bullets that flatten out - some, like hollowpoints, are made that way, sometimes it's just an imperfection in the bullet - prior to impact tear up a lot more flesh than those that flatten either on contact or internally, on contact with bone.

bartl
08-15-2008, 11:43 AM
Not very useful against zombies, though.
Depends on the zombie. Look up burundanga, for example.

bartl
08-15-2008, 11:50 AM
I know. That's why they make good weapons. The ones most commonly commercially available aren't that heavy, maybe a pound and change with an array of D cell batteries in them, but they're good enough to hurt real good whereas your father's type was made to crush skulls.
When I lived in New York City, I learned to use nunchakas on the basis that if most crooks took it from me, they would be just as likely to hurt themselves with it as me. I learned some kendo, and had a boken, but the weapon of choice when going through a not great neighborhood was a brass-headed fighting cane, which, at one point, I was quite skilled with While carrying the last, I got stopped by cops a few times, but it always ended with "good choice" when they realized that it was not a sword cane.