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MWGallaher
02-22-2008, 06:51 PM
We've seen the Tony DeZuniga thread bumped, and he's surely one of the most popular and successful of the many Filipino artists that found their way into American comics in the 1970s. Alongside him strode Alfredo Alcala, Nestor Redondo, Alex Nino, Ernie "Chua" Chan...but there were a *lot* of other talented artists from there who appeared in print in the US. I'd love to hear who else from the Philippines the Classics Comics Forum members found particularly appealing.
I, for one, was slow to warm to Gerry Talaoc, who took over my beloved Phantom Stranger in an ill-advised shift in creative crews, but much later learned to really appreciate his work from reading his Unknown Soldier.
One that earned my respect pretty quickly was the rarely-acknowledged Rico Rival. He got my attention on Marvel's Planet of the Apes magazine, doing the adaptation of "Escape From the Planet of the Apes." His work had a real liveliness to it that I found very appealing and involving.
I also liked E. R. Cruz on the Shadow/Avenger crossover at DC, and have a peculiar fascination for the work of Fred Carillo on the sad final issues of the original Swamp Thing run.

benday-dot
02-22-2008, 07:20 PM
Great topic here close to my four colour heart.

Yep, I'll never get enough Nestor Redondo and Alex Nino in particular... two of the Filipino artists who in scacely resembling each other in style, actually complement each other very nicely.

But... as far as the "lessers" go...

I don't know if you just overlooked him here Michael or if Ruben Yandoc really is to be considered one of the lesser lights, because to me his art so often shines. His stuff on Weird War Tales and on some DC horror titles is especially effective.

But a genuine "lesser" Filipino in my book is the very unprolific Noly Panaligan. He did a handful of Weird Western Tales and not a whole lot else, but I have to say they are every bit as lovely to look at as the DeZuniga stuff.

MWGallaher
02-22-2008, 07:52 PM
I didn't mean "lesser" as a perjorative, but I'd certainly count Yandoc as a "lesser" in that his name doesn't leap to the forefront when discussing the Filipino artists the way that the "big names" I mentioned do. I hadn't remembered Yandoc until you mentioned him (and, without the context, I'd have been thinking of the similarly-named Defenders villain from Marvel Feature #1!).
I didn't remember much of Noly until I read the Jonah Hex Showcase, and yes, he's very good...in fact, I wonder if he didn't do some of the stuff attributed to DeZuniga. Some of that Weird Western stuff credited to him looks to me to be the work of ghosts...and given Tony's rep, I do have to wonder...

Dan B. in the Underworld
02-22-2008, 08:30 PM
I've mentioned Rudy Nebres before as a big favorite of mine from the '70s.

I hereby do so again.

Note to self: Dig out the Filipino artists ish of ... Comic Book Artist, was it? Or maybe Back Issue? -- this weekend to jog some of my memories from those days.

Gerry Alanguilan
02-22-2008, 09:58 PM
A thread designed for me to pounce on. :D

Those already mentioned are favorites of mine as well, but I would add Rudy Florese (who I don't add just because he's my father in law but I was a fan of his long before that). He drew Korak and Tarzan.
http://alanguilan.com/museum/rudyflorese.html

I also like the work of Teny Henson.
http://alanguilan.com/museum/tenyhenson.html

As for those already mentioned, I've pages for some of them as well...
Noly Panaligan
http://alanguilan.com/museum/nolypanaligan.html

Fred Carrillo
http://alanguilan.com/museum/fredcarrillo.html

Rudy Nebres
http://alanguilan.com/museum/rudynebres.html

Plenty more Filipino artists of that generation here:
http://alanguilan.com/museum/

:D

benday-dot
02-23-2008, 09:40 AM
I didn't mean "lesser" as a perjorative, but I'd certainly count Yandoc as a "lesser" in that his name doesn't leap to the forefront when discussing the Filipino artists the way that the "big names" I mentioned do. I hadn't remembered Yandoc until you mentioned him (and, without the context, I'd have been thinking of the similarly-named Defenders villain from Marvel Feature #1!).


No, I knew you wouldn't have met it perjoratively. My appreciation of "The Tribe" (is that a term now considered perjorative?) came later than with others, and, certainly I suspect than your own MW. So my familiarity with the Filipinos all sort of came at once as I would seek out examples of their work. I learned of Nino and Redondo and Alcala (the acknowledged biggies) at around the same time as guys like Yandoc. So I thought maybe I was wrong in counting RY as among the lesser known of a stalwart and stellar group.

Simon Garth
02-24-2008, 03:39 AM
I was very fond of both Alex Nino (eg, the adaptation of "Repent Harlequin..." in UWoSF), and Rudy Nebres (who I think did a lot of work in Deadly Hands of Kung Fu)

Roquefort Raider
02-24-2008, 05:47 AM
I don't know what they put in the water of the Philippines in the 70s, but man! were the artists good.

Among the fellows named above, I see Alex Nino as a comic-book god. Nestor Redondo is way up there as well. As is, of course, Alfredo Alcala. But I mention them out of admiration; they obviously don't fit the theme of the thread.

In an admittedly reductionist way, I see three main trends in the styles of several Filipino artists from the 70s: a scratchy style in the vein of Steve Gan, Ruben Yandoc and Gerry Talaoc; a wood-etching style with several millions lines per image, in the tradition of Ernie Chan, Rudy Nebres or Alfredo Alcala; and a high-contrast approach (which can combine traits from the previous two categories), as can be seen with Tony DeZuniga, Nestor Redondo, Sonny Trinidad or E. R. Cruz.

Whatever the approach, I was always pleased by how these fellows knew their anatomy. The contrast between their art and that of, say, the countless imitators of Jim Lee and Rob Liefeld that plagued the 1990s really shows what a good artist should strive for.

I won't say I liked all Filipino artists on all books, though; some were clearly more suited to certain types of stories than others. In fact, I'd say that most of them were better suited to stories set in the "real" world; war stories, horror stories, westerns or other historical tales. I'd also say that all of them look better in black and white than in the limited color palette of the era's comics. Luckily for us readers, Marvel published plenty of B&W mags illustrated by Filipino artists!

I'd be curious to have access to the mountains of comics these guys produced in the Philippines that never made it here.

Aaron Kashtan
02-24-2008, 08:19 AM
I'd be curious to have access to the mountains of comics these guys produced in the Philippines that never made it here.

Me too. I saw some issues of Filipino komiks while I was working on the Filipino issue of Comic Book Artist, and they looked very interesting. If nothing else, they appeared to be at least as well-drawn as Alcala and Redondo's American work.

A few installments of Alcala's Voltar, which was an award-winning Filipino comic from the '70s, were reprinted in Warren's The Rook magazine. Unfortunately the Voltar stories were sort of overshadowed by the Bravo For Adventure stories in the same issues.

benday-dot
02-24-2008, 08:21 AM
I'd be curious to have access to the mountains of comics these guys produced in the Philippines that never made it here.

I couldn't echo this wish loudly enough RR. Looking through some of the on-line postings of this stuff, including that which Gerry Alanguilan posted on this thread above, it only makes my longing all the greater to get a hold of some of the earlier Filipino comiks themselves, at least to see some of the best of it collected and reprinted for sale today... even if untranslated.

Gerry Alanguilan
02-24-2008, 07:54 PM
A few installments of Alcala's Voltar, which was an award-winning Filipino comic from the '70s, were reprinted in Warren's The Rook magazine. Unfortunately the Voltar stories were sort of overshadowed by the Bravo For Adventure stories in the same issues.

Hello Sir Tim Drake! The Voltar stories that appeared in ROOK, were actually new material. The original Voltar stories appeared in Alcala Fight! Komiks from 1962 to around 1964 and those were written and drawn by Alfredo Alcala, and are as yet un-reprinted.

Alfredo's son Christian has plans of compiling and translating those original Voltar stories as far as I know, this year.