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Duy
04-19-2009, 07:49 PM
I read over Alan Moore's interview on his latest League of Extraordinary Gentleman book and found this quote interesting:

Alan Moore: This third one is actually for me more difficult than the other two, because I know quite a bit about Victorian culture or Edwardian culture or even the culture of the 1950s and 1960s, but I know absolutely nothing about contemporary culture. I am cut off from most inputs. I’m not connected to the internet in any way, I watch very little television. However, luckily we’re in such a media-saturated environment that you absorb all the information you’re going to need just through your skin, through a semi-porous membrane.

I didn't know he cut himself so totally from popular culture. I've read he's a fan of certain TV shows (The Wire, 24, Twin Peaks) but didn't know he desired to cut himself off so much. Fascinating stuff.
It also doesn't show in his work, considering the amount of pop culture references he's privy to making at times.

Stony
04-19-2009, 09:37 PM
It also doesn't show in his work, considering the amount of pop culture references he's privy to making at times.

I was going to say... the amount of pop culture references that came up in PROMETHEA seemed to contradict his luddite-ness
That could have been JHW3's influence though

david r
02-01-2010, 05:40 PM
I saw Alan Moore's Lost Girls book in my local bookstore. It was wrapped up so I couldn't see inside. I am a huge fan of Alan Moore's work, but the price tag for this is $45. That is pretty hig.

Has anyone here read this book? If so, do you think it is worth the $45 dollar price tag? Any thoughts will be highly appreciated. :smile:

Brother Justin Crowe
02-01-2010, 06:09 PM
I saw Alan Moore's Lost Girls book in my local bookstore. It was wrapped up so I couldn't see inside. I am a huge fan of Alan Moore's work, but the price tag for this is $45. That is pretty hig.

Has anyone here read this book? If so, do you think it is worth the $45 dollar price tag? Any thoughts will be highly appreciated. :smile:

Dude, buy it! It's a great book, and that's a friggin' bargain.

FunkyGreenJerusalem
02-01-2010, 06:26 PM
I saw Alan Moore's Lost Girls book in my local bookstore. It was wrapped up so I couldn't see inside. I am a huge fan of Alan Moore's work, but the price tag for this is $45. That is pretty hig.

Has anyone here read this book? If so, do you think it is worth the $45 dollar price tag? Any thoughts will be highly appreciated. :smile:

You can read it, discuss it, and masturbate to it - is that worth $45 to you?

Pól Rua
02-01-2010, 07:17 PM
I could not disagree more. Movies will be one of the few viable avenues in which your fav characters will be profitable.

The Hollywood crap factory will not save comics. If will cling to comics for a bit until it has sucked all the life, verve and joy out of it and then discard it and make a bunch of films based on videogames or pogs or bubblegum cards or something.
Hollywood people are a screwed up hive-mind dedicated to the re-establishment of mediocrity as the new quality. Looking to them as the saviours of any artistic or creative work is like looking to Jeffrey Dahmer as a potential babysitter.

Vigomatic V17
02-01-2010, 11:58 PM
He is a very talented comic book author and despite his lack of drawing skills, his full-script style of writing often ensures a very satisfactory synergy with the artist. However, his reputation and rank within and outside of the comic book medium is wildly disproportionate to his actual talent. Why this is so is based on a variety of factors such as:

1. Making his mark in the super-dominate Superhero genre as opposed to far less popular genres other talented creators work in, ensuring his work had a large audience who are also unfamiliar with his peers.
2. Engaging is esoteric practices and distancing himself from fans and the press to create an aura of mystique (comicdom's own Thomas Pynchon!)
3. Lev Grossman and Richard Lacayo, who shrewdly and perhaps somewhat cynically knew that if they included Watchmen in their "100 Best English Novels from 1923-present" list they would be quoted from here to eternity by hundreds of thousands of comic book fans who are desperate for validation of their chosen medium and people who want to appear as if they know about the comics. Unfortunately, this particular showing is what many comic fans call a "Spider-man vs Flamelord"; an astounding feat displayed which has only occurred once and is generally acknowledged to be widely outside it's usual showings. How many other peer reviewed periodicals place the story so highly?

As a person, his vicious criticisms of the film adaptations of his books strike me as extremely ungracious. If you are so thin skinned about the treatment of your intellectual property then do what Art Spiegelman does, and refuse to sell them to Hollywood people you know will not treat them well.

To those who believe his work transcends the comics medium, making him one of the greatest literary authors of any medium, I can think of no other explanation to this than you are simply not well read in the other mediums.

dancj
02-02-2010, 04:45 AM
If you are so thin skinned about the treatment of your intellectual property then do what Art Spiegelman does, and refuse to sell them to Hollywood people you know will not treat them well.
That's not really fair. I'm guessing he sold the wrights to LoEG, but that was the first film of his work and he probably didn't realise how bad it would be. V for Vendetta and Watchmen weren't his to sell so he had no choice.

Vigomatic V17
02-02-2010, 05:19 AM
From wikipedia I understand Alan did in fact own and sell the rights to V for Vendetta, and that the artist had this to say:

Mr. Lloyd, the illustrator of "V for Vendetta," also found it difficult to sympathize with Mr. Moore's protests. When he and Mr. Moore sold their film rights to the graphic novel, Mr. Lloyd said: "We didn't do it innocently. Neither myself nor Alan thought we were signing it over to a board of trustees who would look after it like it was the Dead Sea Scrolls."

Also I believe From Hell was his first property produced by Hollywood? Given the lack of talent involved all-round in the film project of LOEG it's hard to believe anyone believing it would wander too far off the mark of mediocrity. You do hear some very harsh stories about Hollywood, but Alan’s bitter and venomous statements towards it are hardly civil and very unbecoming.

Dave Hackett
02-02-2010, 06:47 AM
I haven't read the whole thread, but a few posters might not be aware that it wasn't just that LOEG sucked, but the hell he went through with the lawsuit and deposition that really soured him on the whole thing (moreso the fact that the film company settled the case, which Moore took as admission that there was wrongdoing).

king mob
02-02-2010, 08:06 AM
From wikipedia I understand Alan did in fact own and sell the rights to V for Vendetta, and that the artist had this to say:

Mr. Lloyd, the illustrator of "V for Vendetta," also found it difficult to sympathize with Mr. Moore's protests. When he and Mr. Moore sold their film rights to the graphic novel, Mr. Lloyd said: "We didn't do it innocently. Neither myself nor Alan thought we were signing it over to a board of trustees who would look after it like it was the Dead Sea Scrolls."


As typical of Wikipedia it's not telling the full story. The option to make V into a film was sold in the 80's by Dez Skinn with Moore and Lloyd's blessing, & yes there was a hope at the time it might end up as a good film. Moore would have been happy to buy back the rights but both Skinn & Lloyd were unwilling, or unable to do so.



Also I believe From Hell was his first property produced by Hollywood? Given the lack of talent involved all-round in the film project of LOEG it's hard to believe anyone believing it would wander too far off the mark of mediocrity. You do hear some very harsh stories about Hollywood, but Alan’s bitter and venomous statements towards it are hardly civil and very unbecoming.

Why does he have to be civil if he's been fucked about & the end result is shite?

Vigomatic V17
02-02-2010, 03:07 PM
No the wikipedia article was quite clear on that fact too. This entry is well referenced and I made sure to read the actual article it referenced first. It's from the New York Times, here (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/12/movies/12itzk.html?pagewanted=2&_r=1)

Why does he have to be civil? Because it would make me respect him more then if he went into interviews saying things like ""If I had raped and murdered a schoolbus full of retarded children after selling them heroin, I doubt that I would have been cross-examined for 10 hours" and "I will be spitting venom all over it"

FunkyGreenJerusalem
02-02-2010, 03:54 PM
Why does he have to be civil? Because it would make me respect him more then if he went into interviews saying things like ""If I had raped and murdered a schoolbus full of retarded children after selling them heroin, I doubt that I would have been cross-examined for 10 hours" and "I will be spitting venom all over it"

He was grilled for ten hours by entertainment lawyers, who thought they could get millions, believing he'd stolen a screenplay, because of a comic he wrote based on characters in the public domain.
The screenplay and the comic are nothing alike, except for using public domain characters.
You've got to understand he'd be a little pissed.

I could argue it more roundly, but you're one of these bizarre comic literature elitists, who like to piss on Moore, to make themselves feel better.
You know, read an issue of the comic journal and decided it looked like fun, or get made fun of by literature elitists for liking comics, so constantly have to put comics down - even the one's you quietly love - to big yourself up.

Why shit on a guy because superhero fans think he's the bestest ever?
He's not saying he is, he just did some genre experiments.

Where does your venom towards him come from?


To those who believe his work transcends the comics medium, making him one of the greatest literary authors of any medium, I can think of no other explanation to this than you are simply not well read in the other mediums.

Who said that?

You're putting him down to dismiss a statement I've never heard made.

Vigomatic V17
02-02-2010, 04:47 PM
FunkyGreenJerusalem, I'm sure your ribbing is in good fun :smile:. Your accusations are baseless, so I wont bother to defend myself agains them.

I called him very talented, then say I find his reactions to his movie adaptations to be lacking in grace and a tad hypocritical, but thanks to Dave Hackett and king mob clarifying some things, I realise that it is not nearly as bad as I thought. I guess all that's left to say about this is that we all encounter bad situations in life; someone's ability to handle a bad situation with grace is a quality I admire, and the inability to do so is something I don't.

In regards to your comment "who said that?" please refer to post #19 where the poster says "And I can unreservedly say that Watchmen is the most superbly crafted piece of fiction I've ever read. Period. " I maintain my opinion that this person, and others who share must not be very widely read. I hope that clarifies the comment I made.

FunkyGreenJerusalem
02-02-2010, 05:21 PM
FunkyGreenJerusalem, I'm sure your ribbing is in good fun :smile:. Your accusations are baseless, so I wont bother to defend myself agains them.

I called him very talented, then say I find his reactions to his movie adaptations to be lacking in grace and a tad hypocritical, but thanks to Dave Hackett and king mob clarifying some things, I realise that it is not nearly as bad as I thought. I guess all that's left to say about this is that we all encounter bad situations in life; someone's ability to handle a bad situation with grace is a quality I admire, and the inability to do so is something I don't.

Fair enough - he just seems to have become a whipping boy lately for people, less for anything he's done or said, but because they are bored with him being #1 - which I tend to see as damning on every other writer, not on Moore himself.


In regards to your comment "who said that?" please refer to post #19 where the poster says "And I can unreservedly say that Watchmen is the most superbly crafted piece of fiction I've ever read. Period. " I maintain my opinion that this person, and others who share must not be very widely read. I hope that clarifies the comment I made.

I didn't read that far back - this threads been going a few years - but wow.
Yeah, I hope they aren't well read as well.

He's possibly right about it being the best we may ever see in the genre of superheroes... but that's one genre.

david r
02-02-2010, 05:24 PM
Thanks for the replies on "Lost Girls" I am a huge fan of Alan Moore, but couldn't see inside the book to see whether it's worth the $45 price. I know it's controversial. Thanks again!

Vigomatic V17
02-02-2010, 05:58 PM
Fair enough - he just seems to have become a whipping boy lately for people, less for anything he's done or said, but because they are bored with him being #1 - which I tend to see as damning on every other writer, not on Moore himself.

I didn't read that far back - this threads been going a few years - but wow.
Yeah, I hope they aren't well read as well.

He's possibly right about it being the best we may ever see in the genre of superheroes... but that's one genre.

I agree with everything you've said here. Sorry this post doesn't really add anything to the discussion but I thought it was worth saying anyway.

Libaax
02-02-2010, 06:10 PM
I think some of his works might a bit overrated but he has writing ability enough to be comics legend that will be remembered. LOEG for example is good,fun comics,not great series.

I have seen other forum where I said I liked Sin City(the best books) more than LOEG,V For Vendetta people was shocked that FM could even be compared to him.

There are too many fans that will read him but not other comics,who will make it that other legends like FM is only childish superhero comics.....

Like how Sandman is accepted by non-comics readers.

I think there are no comics writer that is best at every kind of story even inside this one medium.

comicsmetal
02-02-2010, 11:05 PM
The Hollywood crap factory will not save comics. If will cling to comics for a bit until it has sucked all the life, verve and joy out of it and then discard it and make a bunch of films based on videogames or pogs or bubblegum cards or something.
Hollywood people are a screwed up hive-mind dedicated to the re-establishment of mediocrity as the new quality. Looking to them as the saviours of any artistic or creative work is like looking to Jeffrey Dahmer as a potential babysitter.

Then if not hollywood what will.

Pól Rua
02-03-2010, 12:38 AM
Then if not hollywood what will.
Comics do not NEED saving. People have been wailing that we are in the funnybook end times for decades. It's horse-dookie.
Here's a better idea.
1. End Diamond's distribution monopoly.
2. Improve distribution beyond specialty stores.
3. Create a more diverse product aimed at a wider audience.
4. Explore alternative marketing and promotion.
Comics are words and pictures. The longer we try and pretend that comics are nothing but dumb superhero fistfights and continuity-based nerd porn the more of a potential audience we're going to alienate. Comics need to stop shooting themselves in the foot, take a damn shower, use deodorant, move out of their parents' basement and acknowledge that there's a world that doesn't give a rat's arse who Spider-Man is fighting this week.

comicsmetal
02-03-2010, 01:28 AM
Comics do not NEED saving. People have been wailing that we are in the funnybook end times for decades. It's horse-dookie.
Here's a better idea.
1. End Diamond's distribution monopoly.
2. Improve distribution beyond specialty stores.
3. Create a more diverse product aimed at a wider audience.
4. Explore alternative marketing and promotion.
Comics are words and pictures. The longer we try and pretend that comics are nothing but dumb superhero fistfights and continuity-based nerd porn the more of a potential audience we're going to alienate. Comics need to stop shooting themselves in the foot, take a damn shower, use deodorant, move out of their parents' basement and acknowledge that there's a world that doesn't give a rat's arse who Spider-Man is fighting this week.

Okey just wanted to see what you said but I do agree it is a bit of a joke and I agree on you with all accounts.

Libaax
02-03-2010, 07:31 AM
I agrea about distribution,diverse product. There will need to be bigger place for readers that dont like to read superhero every month. The bizz would be bigger then. Look at manga, there are books that dominate trade sales that isnt teenage,fantasy,superhero like.

king mob
02-03-2010, 11:29 AM
No the wikipedia article was quite clear on that fact too. This entry is well referenced and I made sure to read the actual article it referenced first. It's from the New York Times, here (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/12/movies/12itzk.html?pagewanted=2&_r=1)

As said the article misses out how the rights were sold and how at the time these were a bunch of creators thinkig more about the money, not to mention the rather large role of Dez Skinn in the sale.


Why does he have to be civil? Because it would make me respect him more then if he went into interviews saying things like ""If I had raped and murdered a schoolbus full of retarded children after selling them heroin, I doubt that I would have been cross-examined for 10 hours" and "I will be spitting venom all over it"

Why does he need to appease you or any of the other people who demand him to be civil whe he's got every right to take the piss out of Hollywood?

king mob
02-03-2010, 11:32 AM
Fair enough - he just seems to have become a whipping boy lately for people, less for anything he's done or said, but because they are bored with him being #1 - which I tend to see as damning on every other writer, not on Moore himself.

It's a terrible state of affairs that Moore is still the most diverse and talented writers of mainstream comics and he's divorced himself of the mainstream for nearly a decade.