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View Full Version : Who is V? V for Vendetta (Spoilers) classic question.



unkiedev
02-01-2006, 05:15 PM
So I just got around to reading V for Vendetta. I liked it. Not my favorite Alan Moore work by far, but it certainly is the primordial ooze from which all his other stories crawl.

Now, being the cheeky lad that he is, Alan says in the closing essay in the version I read that he "Isn't going to tell us who V really was", but it does imply that the character, irregardless to who he/she becomes or symbolizes, is an actual person who's identity can be gleaned by the clever.

I bet this has been debated a bunch of times, but can you comic book resources folks tell me:

Who is V?

Spiff
02-01-2006, 06:19 PM
Here I thought V was always supposed to just be an unknown. I'd need to reread it to "gather clues," although I'm sure I'd be just as clueless.

Expletive Deleted
02-01-2006, 06:23 PM
My impression is that V could be one of Evey's suspects, but . . . if he is, it doesn't matter.

Lurker
02-01-2006, 06:43 PM
Its been awhile but wasn't he patient #5 and then the girl carried on for him?

kmeyers
02-01-2006, 06:56 PM
Its been awhile but wasn't he patient #5 and then the girl carried on for him?
But who is patient #5?

Watchman
02-01-2006, 07:34 PM
V is an idea.

He says so in the book. :p

Who he actually is physically is never shown. It doesn't matter, his identity is much better kept a secret.

kmeyers
02-01-2006, 09:40 PM
V is an idea.

He says so in the book. :p

Who he actually is physically is never shown. It doesn't matter, his identity is much better kept a secret.
Definitely.

I hope we never see the face of the actor playing V in the movie, either.

V could be anyone, noone and everyone at the same time.

Sandoz
02-01-2006, 10:31 PM
All we know for sure is that V wasn't Evey's father. Since he was in the concentration camp, he was either gay, Jewish, an ethnic minority, or someone with extreme liberal/socialist leanings.

It's not as if V has a secret identity; he is V, all the time. There's no mystery to solve.


it does imply that the character, irregardless to who he/she becomes or symbolizes, is an actual person who's identity can be gleaned by the clever.
I don't think he was implying that. Rather, was saying that he never intended to give V a lengthy origin or a soliloquy about his pre-camp life.

unkiedev
02-01-2006, 10:37 PM
I disagree. The story takes place between 1985-97. The story was written in 82-83, I believe.

Yes, V is an idea and it DOESN'T MATTER who this person was, but I do believe there is an actual person that V is. I'm almost positive I've read a quote from Moore saying "Read the clues, it's there."

Moore, with his obsession of magic and literature might have picked some actual cultural/historic figure of the 70's/early 80's to be this person...or it could be a mentioned character.

I know it's not important who V is, but I do think it was supposed to be somebody.

Sandoz
02-01-2006, 10:56 PM
Yes, V is an idea and it DOESN'T MATTER who this person was, but I do believe there is an actual person that V is. I'm almost positive I've read a quote from Moore saying "Read the clues, it's there."
If you can find the quote, I'd be interested in reading it.



I know it's not important who V is, but I do think it was supposed to be somebody.
But why would Moore go through the trouble of giving V a "secret identity" if it is completely irrelevant to the story and goes against the very point of the character?

Jack Destruct
02-02-2006, 01:09 AM
I hope we never see the face of the actor playing V in the movie, either.

Well, seeing as the ad I saw didn't even mention Hugo Weaving's name, I'd say that we probably won't.

Which is definately a good thing.

I agree with the naysayers, I doubt there are any clues in the story. 'Cause the story has nothing to do with his identity, just his fight.

TomGun13
02-02-2006, 04:54 AM
Well, seeing as the ad I saw didn't even mention Hugo Weaving's name, I'd say that we probably won't.

Which is definately a good thing.

I agree with the naysayers, I doubt there are any clues in the story. 'Cause the story has nothing to do with his identity, just his fight.

Speaking of the movie, anyone read the article on Larry Wachowski (I think it was Larry) in a recent Rolling Stone?

stealthwise
02-02-2006, 09:46 AM
V is an obscured, twisted version of the "everyman," which is certainly why I don't to see Weaving's face or even hear his very-recognizable voice. The whole point of exploiting the comic form's ability to mask sounds and voices would seem to be shot otherwise.

I don't think that V was intended to be anybody who actually exists in popular form.

unkiedev
02-02-2006, 10:32 AM
Here is an article on this topic. It puts forth the "Who cares, it's not important" philosophy.

http://www.shadowgalaxy.net/Vendetta/whov.html

At the end of the article the writer quotes line from Moore at the end of V's epiloge:

"I was going to go on from this point and tell you exactly who V really is, but I'm afraid I've run out of room. The only real hint I can give is that V isn't Evey's father, Whistler's mother, or Charley's aunt. Beyond that, I'm afraid you're on your own." --Alan Moore

-Who are the faces that Evey imagines are v? I know one is her father, and one is herself at 16. Who where the other 2 faces? I didn't recognize them.

unkiedev
02-02-2006, 10:46 AM
Here's the thing, or at least why I'm sticking to V actually having a real identity apart from the idea that V represents:

Alan Moore is just that clever. The man's head is a treasure trove of every book, movie and song he has ever heard. Have you read his essays on the L.E.G.? He has stated a few times he doesn't do second drafts of his work, that he just sits and writes.

Read the L.E.G. unofficial companions. The author has a few quotes from Alan about characters he and the artist just threw in for laughs to see if anyone ever noticed. It seems to me Alan Moore would do the same thing with V, have it be some actual, possibly obscure figure just for laughs...kinda like the movie Six-String Samurai.

Jack Destruct
02-03-2006, 04:47 PM
I still don't think there are any clues.

I'm sure Alan Moore knows exactly who V is, but that doesn't mean he put it in the book anywhere. Every good writer needs to know everything there is to know about their characters, even if none of it ends up in the story. It's the only way to write realistic characters.

So, yeah sure, Alan Moore cooked up an entire history for V, but he didn't write any of it down, 'cause he didn't need to.

shadow of a madman
02-03-2006, 08:09 PM
I'm prettymuch in the "Who cares/doesn't matter" camp,but how about this,just for the hey of it:
Well all know Evey was being groomed as V's successor,right?Maybye not.Maybye it was Evey all along.Maybye the whole process of "awakening" Evey,the whole deal V subjected her to,was actually meant to "Awaken" her consious mind.The V persona was a subconious thing,and this was it making it's way to the consious portion of her psyche.
Kind of a "Fight Club" thing.
But I only read V for Vendetta once and a while ago,so there's probably holes a-plenty in this theory.
Just throwing it out there.

Watchman
02-03-2006, 09:47 PM
shadow of a madman:

It sounds plausible, but there's some kind of doubt in my mind as to that explanation. I can't fully explain in words, but parts don't make sense.

For example: The beginning, where she is about to get punished for soliciting sex, and V comes in and saves her... I really don't think that was her unconcious, do you? I mean, both her AND the guys saw V appear.

Butters415
02-04-2006, 01:35 AM
Hey Unkiedev, what characters did Alan Moore throw into his stories just to see who would notice? I'm curious, but not curious enough to read the book you mentioned. :)

king mob
02-04-2006, 06:09 AM
I know it's not important who V is, but I do think it was supposed to be somebody.

The original idea was that V would be Marvelman (which is why he's able to punch through human skin, move fast, etc as detailed in the early episodes) as the whole concept by Dez Skinn was to have a shared universe in Warrior.

However Moore realised virtually right away that this would be bollocks and quickly wrote out any hint of it apart from the few early hints in story and art.

Come V book 2 Moore turned V into a concept rather than an actual character and as said, it doesn't matter who V is. Thats the point, V can be anyone and anyone can be V.

Jack Destruct
02-04-2006, 05:40 PM
But I only read V for Vendetta once and a while ago,so there's probably holes a-plenty in this theory.
Just throwing it out there.

I think the main problem with that theory is that Evey was only 6 years old (or so) when V was in the concentration camp.
I think when the book opens she's still only meant to be 16 or so, so I don't think that's what AM would've been going for.


Hey Unkiedev, what characters did Alan Moore throw into his stories just to see who would notice? I'm curious, but not curious enough to read the book you mentioned.

I can't remember any exact references, but a police inspector they talk to at the start is out of a Sherlock Holmes story, the Villain in Volume 1 is Fu Man Chu, though they couldn't get the rights to use that name. Stuff like that.

Wouldn't mean anything to you unless you'd read a lot of Victiorian Era fiction though.

unkiedev
02-06-2006, 07:03 AM
I can't remember any exact references, but a police inspector they talk to at the start is out of a Sherlock Holmes story, the Villain in Volume 1 is Fu Man Chu, though they couldn't get the rights to use that name. Stuff like that.

Wouldn't mean anything to you unless you'd read a lot of Victiorian Era fiction though.

Exactly, Butters415, stuff like that. Throughout the second volume of League are a man and woman street tramps who were advertising icons in the 1800's for biscuits and cocoa, or something like that. A little boy who watches his parents die and is rescued by nemo grows up to be a Nemo Knock-Off character in victorian Literature...it's all stuff like that, stuff no one WOULD ever notice unless they were a Victorian Lit Scholar. (I'm not, but I did read the book the Victorian Lit Scholar wrote)

I suppose you fellers are right....there is no Identity for V. Right now I'm thinking it was probably Mic Jagger, but you are right, probably no one.

Naldo
02-10-2006, 08:57 PM
V is the Dread Pirate Roberts of course!

FunkyGreenJerusalem
02-11-2006, 12:35 PM
A little boy who watches his parents die and is rescued by nemo grows up to be a Nemo Knock-Off character in victorian Literature...

That one annoyed me. I had no idea who that kid was meant to be, but it was so obvoius he was meant to be someone.



I suppose you fellers are right....there is no Identity for V. Right now I'm thinking it was probably Mic Jagger, but you are right, probably no one.

If V had an identity, even if it was only hinted that the author knew somewhere in the story, then the story would be ruined.
It's a big part of the point/theme of the story that V has no identity - because he could be anyone.

TrappedInTheDcUniverse
07-01-2009, 08:21 AM
I disagree. The story takes place between 1985-97. The story was written in 82-83, I believe.

Yes, V is an idea and it DOESN'T MATTER who this person was, but I do believe there is an actual person that V is. I'm almost positive I've read a quote from Moore saying "Read the clues, it's there."

Moore, with his obsession of magic and literature might have picked some actual cultural/historic figure of the 70's/early 80's to be this person...or it could be a mentioned character.

I know it's not important who V is, but I do think it was supposed to be somebody.

I agree. If you read the V for Vendetta where all the books are put into one big one,(The 1995 version) towards the end many of you have seen the whole interview or whatever with Alan Moore about V's creation. Yes the said V was an "idea". They didn't mean he had no secret identity. As the person who asked the question said, in Alan Moores Interview He said "I was going to tell you who V really was, but it seems i've run out of room to write it. England Prevails." *Curtains Close*

lead sharp
07-01-2009, 10:18 AM
V is the voice you hear when you're reading the book.

Duy
07-01-2009, 11:44 AM
In my younger, less critical days, I always liked the idea that V was Valerie, and then just added some twists of my own to make that work.

It makes no sense and is a completely wrong interpretation, but I just think there's a poignancy to it.

Brother Justin Crowe
07-01-2009, 01:55 PM
V is the Red Hulk, aka Doctor Thomas Elliott. He killed Laura Palmer and JFK, and may or may not have been DB Cooper.

jesse_custer
07-01-2009, 02:12 PM
Does it matter?